Science

In this undated photo provided by Eric Regehr, polar bears are seen on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Circle. A study of polar bears in the Chukchi Sea between Alaska and Russia finds that the population is thriving for now despite a loss of sea ice due to climate change. Lead author Eric Regehr of the University of Washington says the Chukchi may be buffered from some effects of ice loss. Regehr says polar bears can build fat reserves and the Chukchi's abundant seal population may allow bears to compensate for a loss of hunting time on ice. (AP Photo Eric Regehr via AP)
November 15, 2018 - 8:43 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The first formal count of polar bears in waters between the United States and Russia indicates they're doing better than some of their cousins elsewhere. Polar bears are listed as a threatened species because of diminished sea ice due to climate change. But university and...
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In this July 11, 2018 photo, animal geneticist Alison Van Eenennaam of the University of California, Davis, points to a group of dairy calves that won’t have to be de-horned thanks to gene editing. The calves are descended from a bull genetically altered to be hornless, and the company behind the work, Recombinetics, says gene-edited traits could ease animal suffering and improve productivity. (AP Photo/Haven Daley)
November 15, 2018 - 7:52 am
OAKFIELD, N.Y. (AP) — Cows that can withstand hotter temperatures. Cows born without pesky horns. Pigs that never reach puberty. A company wants to alter farm animals by adding and subtracting genetic traits in a lab. It sounds like science fiction, but Recombinetics sees opportunity for its...
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FILE-In this March 10, 2015 file photo, firefighters burned about 30 acres of oak woodland Tuesday, March 10, 2015, during a prescribed burn along the eastern edge of Whiskeytown National Recreation Area in Shasta County, Calif. Creating fire buffers between housing and dry grasslands and brush and burying spark-prone power lines underground would give people a better chance of surviving wildfires, experts say. So would controlled burns, a proven, historic practice that has been neglected in recent decades.(Andreas Fuhrmann/The Record Searchlight via AP)
November 14, 2018 - 5:29 pm
BILLINGS, Montana (AP) — Creating fire buffers between housing and dry brush and burying spark-prone power lines underground would give people a better chance of surviving wildfires, experts say. So would controlled burns, a proven, historic practice that has been neglected in recent decades. Some...
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Fred Gmitter, a geneticist at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, right, visits a citrus grower in an orange grove affected by citrus greening disease in Fort Meade, Fla., on Sept. 27, 2018. "If we can go in and edit the gene, change the DNA sequence ever so slightly by one or two letters, potentially we'd have a way to defeat this disease," says Gmitter. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)
November 14, 2018 - 4:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart. By early next year, the first foods from plants or animals that had their DNA "edited" are...
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FILE - In this Monday, Aug. 28, 2017 file photo, floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey overflow from Buffalo Bayou in downtown Houston, Texas. A study released on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018 says that between being tripped up by downtown and the bigger effect of massive paving and building up of the metro area to reduce drainage, development in Houston on average increased the extreme flooding risk by 21 times. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
November 14, 2018 - 1:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Humans helped make recent devastating U.S. hurricanes wetter but in different ways, two new studies find. Hurricane Harvey snagged on the skyscrapers of Houston, causing it to slow and dump more rain than it normally would, one study found. The city's massive amounts of paving had...
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This illustration provided by Gleiver Prieto and Katerina Harvati shows a group of Neanderthals hunting with non-projectile weapons. A new analysis released on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018 says life as a Neanderthal was no picnic, but no more dangerous than what our own species faced in ancient times. (Gleiver Prieto/Katerina Harvati via AP)
November 14, 2018 - 1:02 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Life as a Neanderthal was no picnic, but a new analysis says it was no more dangerous than what our own species faced in ancient times. The study challenges the common view that our evolutionary cousins lived especially risky lives. It was released Wednesday by the journal Nature...
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This 2014 photo provided by the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund shows a group of mountain gorillas in Rwanda's Volcanoes National Park. On Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018, the International Union for Conservation of Nature updated the species’ status from “critically endangered” to “endangered.” The designation is more promising, but still precarious. (Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund via AP)
November 14, 2018 - 10:52 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — There are more gorillas in the mist — a rare conservation success story, scientists say. After facing near-extinction, mountain gorillas are slowly rebounding. On Wednesday, the Switzerland-based International Union for Conservation of Nature updated mountain gorillas' status from...
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A portion of a once-classified CIA report that disclosed the existence of a drug research program dubbed "Project Medication" is photographed in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018. Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug that might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce anxiety, was “possibly worth a try.” But in the end, the CIA decided not to ask government lawyers to approve its use. The American Civil Liberties Union fought in court to have the report released. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick
November 13, 2018 - 11:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug it thought might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce...
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This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018 photo shows part of an ingredient label, which lists "artificial flavoring," on a packet of candy in New York. In November 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has decided to give companies two years to purge their products of the six ingredients, described only as “artificial flavors” on packages. The words “artificial flavor” or “natural flavor” refer to any of thousands of ingredients. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)
November 13, 2018 - 11:28 am
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators are giving food companies two years to remove six artificial flavors from their products, even though they say the ingredients are safe in the trace amounts used. The move highlights tension between consumer advocates, who want to know more about what exactly is in...
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Flames climb trees as the Camp Fire tears through Paradise, Calif., on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
November 12, 2018 - 2:20 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Both nature and humans share blame for California's devastating wildfires, but forest management did not play a major role, despite President Donald Trump's claims, fire scientists say. Nature provides the dangerous winds that have whipped the fires, and human-caused climate...
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