Science

FILE - In this July 25, 2018 file photo, Hannah Whyatt poses for a friend's photo as smoke from the Ferguson fire fills Yosemite Valley in Yosemite National Park, Calif. Alarmed by as much as $20 million in lost tourism revenue in July due to visitors' fear of wildfires, California tourism officials are teaming up with Oregon and Washington to reassure tourists they're safe to visit after deadly wildfires that have burned homes and clogged the air. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
August 23, 2018 - 6:29 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Alarmed by as much as $20 million in lost tourism revenue in July due to visitors' fear of wildfires, California's state tourism agency said Thursday it is teaming up with Oregon and Washington state to reassure tourists it's safe to visit. The states formed the West Coast...
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This satellite image provided by NOAA shows Hurricane Lane near Hawaii on Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018. Hurricane Lane soaked Hawaii's Big Island on Thursday, and the The National Weather Service warned that some areas could see up to 30 inches before the system passes. (NOAA via AP)
August 23, 2018 - 3:18 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Hurricanes seldom get close to Hawaii and it's even rarer for one of the islands to take a direct hit. Hurricane Lane is already drenching and pummeling the island chain, even without reaching land. The last time a major hurricane hit Hawaii was in 1992 when Category 4 Iniki...
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On of the so called "hunger stones" exposed by the low level of water in the Elbe river is seen in Decin, Czech Republic, Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018. The low level of water caused by the recent drought has exposed some stones at the river bed whose appearances in history meant for people to get ready for troubles. They are known as the "hunger stones" and they were chosen in the past to record low water levels. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)
August 23, 2018 - 9:56 am
DECIN, Czech Republic (AP) — Due to this summer's drought in Central Europe, boulders known as "hunger stones" are reappearing in the Elbe River. The low water levels in the river that begins in the Czech Republic then crosses Germany into the North Sea has exposed stones on the river bed whose...
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August 22, 2018 - 6:39 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Whichever way the wind blows, a new satellite launched Wednesday will be watching it. The Aeolus satellite will be the first to directly measure wind speeds and directions all over the globe, allowing scientists to improve worldwide weather forecasts. "This has not been done before...
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File - This March 16, 2017, file photo released by the Bannock County Sheriff's Office shows a cyanide device in Pocatello, Idaho, The cyanide device, called M-44, is spring-activated and shoots poison that is meant to kill predators. The U.S. government says an Idaho boy and his parents are to blame for any injuries to the boy claimed in a lawsuit contending he was doused with cyanide by a predator-killing trap a federal worker mistakenly placed near their home. The U.S. Department of Justice in documents filed Monday, Aug. 20, 2018, in U.S. District Court says any injuries were caused by the negligence of the parents and child, and the lawsuit should be dismissed. (Bannock County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
August 22, 2018 - 5:12 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — The U.S. government said an Idaho family is to blame for any injuries it alleges a boy received after he was doused with cyanide by a predator-killing trap that a federal worker mistakenly placed near their home. Any injuries were caused by the negligence of the parents and...
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FILE - In this July 21, 2016 file photo, fireflies light up in synchronized bursts as photographers take long-exposure pictures, inside Piedra Canteada, a tourist camp cooperatively owned by 42 local families, inside an old-growth forest near the town of Nanacamilpa, Tlaxcala state, Mexico. A study released on Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018 in the journal Science Advances, says that fireflies seem to use their lights to tell bats they taste bad. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
August 22, 2018 - 2:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fireflies flash not just for sex, but survival, a new study suggests. Scientists wanted to find out if there's more to the lightning bug's signature blinking glow than finding a mate. Some experts had speculated it was a glaring signal to predators, like bats, that fireflies taste...
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August 21, 2018 - 5:58 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — States with a history of fighting air pollution generated by coal-fired power plants on Tuesday criticized a move by President Donald Trump's administration to scale back federal restrictions on emissions, with some threatening court challenges. Illinois Attorney General Lisa...
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President Donald Trump speaks during an event to salute U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Aug. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
August 20, 2018 - 8:31 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is set to roll back the centerpiece of President Barack Obama's efforts to slow global warming, the Clean Power Plan that restricts greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. A plan to be announced Tuesday would give states broad authority to...
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Smoke from wildfires obscures a scenic view near Lewiston, Idaho, Monday, Aug. 20, 2018. Smoke from wildfires clogged the sky across the U.S. West, blotting out mountains and city skylines from Oregon to Colorado, delaying flights and forcing authorities to tell even healthy adults in the Seattle, Wash., area to stay indoors. (AP Photo/Jennifer Peltz)
August 20, 2018 - 7:49 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Smoke from wildfires clogged the sky across the U.S. West, blotting out mountains and city skylines from Oregon to Colorado, delaying flights and forcing authorities to tell even healthy adults in the Seattle area to stay indoors. As large cities dealt with unhealthy air for a second...
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In this July 29, 2017 photo provided by KYUK-TV shows a gray whale that was killed in the Kuskokwim River is butchered and the meat and blubber distributed. Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, according to a federal investigative report. The report, released to The Associated Press through a public records, says that after the shooting began, the hunters then believed the whale to be a bowhead and that the harvest would be theirs as the first to shoot or harpoon it. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration decided not to prosecute the hunters. Instead it sent letters advising leaders in three villages about the limits to subsistence whaling. (Katie Basile/KYUK via AP)
August 20, 2018 - 7:19 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, a federal investigative report said. After the...
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