Pages from the Senate Intelligence Committee report that details Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election is photographed in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2019. The new Senate report on Russian interference in U.S. elections highlights one of the biggest challenges to preventing foreign meddling: the limited ability of the U.S. government to protect elections run by state and local officials. That has given fuel to those who argue that a larger federal role is needed.(AP Photo/Jon Elswick)

Myriad election systems complicate efforts to stop hackers

July 27, 2019 - 12:33 am

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new Senate report on Russian interference in U.S. elections is highlighting one of the biggest challenges to preventing foreign meddling: the limited powers and ability of the federal government to protect elections run by state and local officials.

And that has given fuel to arguments that a larger federal role is needed.

The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence issued the first part of its report into Russian interference in the 2016 election on Thursday. It notes Russian agents "exploited the seams" between federal government expertise and ill-equipped state and local election officials.

It also calls for the reinforcement of state oversight of elections — a view blasted as inadequate by Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon. He is calling on Congress to establish mandatory cybersecurity requirements across the country.

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