NJ Transit downed tree

NJ Transit

Morning Thunderstorms Cause Transit Problems, Power Outages

April 15, 2019 - 12:09 pm
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NEW YORK (WCBS 880) – Fast moving, severe weather rolled through the Tri-State on Monday morning, causing scattered power outages and transit troubles for NJ Transit, LIRR and Metro-North riders.

A tornado watch was briefly in effect for much of the area but was lifted around 5 a.m.

AccuWeather says the gusty weather continues Monday, with a wind advisory in effect from noon until 2 a.m. Tuesday as gusts top 45 mph.

The severe thunderstorms quickly moved through New Jersey and across the city before daybreak Monday, bringing damaging winds, heavy downpours and lighting.

Authorities believe a series of lightning strikes set fire to a home in Rutherford. The house was badly damaged but the residents were able to escape with injury.

NJ Transit suspended service in both directions on the North Jersey Coast Line over a downed tree near Middletown.

There were also scattered delays and cancellations on Metro-North and the LIRR, including on the Babylon and Ronkonkoma branches.

Scattered power outages were reported across the region, including tens of thousands of JCP&L and PSE&G customers in New Jersey. Several thousand Con Edison and PSEG customers in New York and Long Island were also affected.

Rebecca Mazzarella, a spokesperson for PSEG, said the gusty weather was likely to blame for the loss of power.

"It looks like the wind played a pretty major role in the damages, with trees falling on the wires, so it was a significant event," she said. 

Mazzarella said crews are doing everything they can to restore power but that workers will not go up to do restoration if winds are above 30 or 40 mph. 

Police on Long Island believe weather may have caused a small plane to crash in a Valley Stream neighborhood around 10 p.m. Sunday. The three people on board the plane were not injured. 

AccuWeather says it will be windy and partly sunny the rest of the day Monday as temperatures fall from the 60s to the 50s.