Report: Michael Bloomberg Still Considering Running For President

WCBS 880 Newsroom
October 14, 2019 - 7:06 pm
Michael Bloomberg

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NEW YORK (WCBS 880) — Former mayor Michael Bloomberg says he is rethinking his decision to stay out of the 2020 presidential race, according to a CNBC report.

Bloomberg has "indicated to associates in recent weeks that Joe Biden's recent struggles against Sen. Elizabeth Warren are making him rethink his decision to stay out of the 2020 Democratic primary,” CNBC reported.

The 77-year-old suggested he is still considering running and sources told the network that he would likely enter the race if Biden dropped out early in the Democratic primary.

“I think it’s something he wants. He has not been shy about that,” one source revealed to CNBC. “Nothing can happen unless Biden drops out, and that’s not happening anytime soon."

A billionaire with ties to the former mayor also reportedly said, “Bloomberg is in if Biden is out.”

Associates, say among other things, Bloomberg is mostly concerned about Sen. Elizabeth Warren's wealth tax plan.

Under her proposal, any household with a net worth greater than $50 million dollars would pay a 2% tax and any household with a net worth of over $1 billion would pay a 3% tax.

Baruch College political science professor Doug Muzzio says if Bloomberg got in, “He wants to take Biden’s place as the, you know, intelligent moderate in the field, but by getting in the race and really running head to head against Warren, he stands to alienate a significant portion of the Democratic progressive base.”

Muzzio says although Bloomberg would be a formidable presidential candidate, if the party was split it could cost them the election.

During his three terms as New York City’s mayor, Bloomberg was a Republican and an independent.

He previously registered as a Democrat before the 2018 midterm elections, and has said he would run as a Democrat if he pursued the White House this time.

According to reports, Bloomberg is also mapping out a campaign spending map of more than $100 million.