Addiction and substance abuse

In this March 6, 2020 photo, Charlie Campbell, right, walks with his mother, Dorothy Campbell, to visit his father, Gene, who was staying at the time at the Life Care Center in Kirkland, Wash. Charlie Campbell is nearly 13 years sober, but said he has been feeling tested due to stress from having his father now recovering from the new coronavirus in a hospital, and several other sources of worry and stress in his life. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
AP News
April 01, 2020 - 1:04 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Charlie Campbell, nearly 13 years sober, is feeling tested today more than ever to stay that way. His dad is recovering from COVID-19 in a suburban Seattle hospital. His mom, who has dementia, lives in a facility that now bars visitors because of the virus. A good friend recently...
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FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2018 file photo, Andrew Gillum the Democrat candidate for governor speaks at a news conference in Tallahassee, Fla. Gillum is named in a police report Friday, March 13, 2020 saying he was “inebriated" and initially unresponsive in a hotel room where authorities found baggies of suspected crystal methamphetamine. Gillum, the former Tallahassee mayor who ran for governor in 2018, is not charged with any crime. The Miami Beach police report says that Gillum was allowed to leave the hotel for home after he was checked out medically. (AP Photo/Steve Cannon, File)
March 15, 2020 - 9:33 pm
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Former Florida candidate for governor Andrew Gillum disclosed Sunday that he is entering a rehabilitation facility, saying he had fallen into a depression and alcohol abuse after losing his bid for the state's highest post. The Democrat's statement came days after Gillum...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2019, file photo, sleeping people, discarded clothes and used needles are seen on a street in the Tenderloin neighborhood in San Francisco. A center for people experiencing methamphetamine-induced psychosis will open in San Francisco as the city struggles with a rise in drug overdoses and rampant street drug use. The San Francisco Chronicle reports the center will open in late spring. (AP Photo/Janie Har, File)
February 06, 2020 - 4:45 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A center for people experiencing methamphetamine-induced psychosis will open in San Francisco to help them get sober in a safe place, the latest effort to address the city's rising drug overdoses and rampant street drug use. The center, believed to be the first in the U.S...
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This undated photo provided by Garrett Hade shows shows Hade at Recovery Fest hosted by Above The Noise Foundation event. Hade, said he has been sober for nearly five years after a long odyssey through addiction that began with OxyContin when he was a teenager in Florida. As an organizer with the Recovery Advocacy Project, Hade said he's telling people that they'll be able to make claims against Purdue Pharma. (Garrett Hade via AP)
Associated Press
January 24, 2020 - 4:37 pm
State and local governments have been leading the legal fight against the opioid industry, seeking payouts to help them deal with the fallout from the nation's addiction crisis. Average Americans are about to get their shot. On Friday, the federal judge overseeing the bankruptcy case of Purdue...
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FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2019, file photo, members of the Coast Guard stand near seized cocaine in Los Angeles. The nation's drug addiction crisis has been morphing in a deadly new direction: more Americans struggling with meth and cocaine. Now the government will allow states to use federal money earmarked of the opioid crisis to help people addicted to those drugs as well. The change to a $1.5 billion opioid grants program was buried in a massive spending bill that Congress passed late in 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, file)
January 21, 2020 - 1:33 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Alarmed by a deadly new twist in the nation's drug addiction crisis, the government will allow states to use federal money earmarked for the opioid epidemic to help growing numbers of people struggling with meth and cocaine. The little-noticed change is buried in a massive...
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FILE - IN this Nov. 8, 2016 file photo, Democratic senatorial candidate U.S. Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick, D-Ariz., speaks to supporters during an election night party in Phoenix. Kirkpatrick said Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020, that she's taking time off from her congressional duties to seek treatment for alcohol dependence after a “serious” fall. Kirkpatrick, said she's “finally seeking this help after struggling to do so in the past." (AP Photo/Matt York)
January 15, 2020 - 6:43 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — U.S. Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick of Arizona said Wednesday that she's taking time off from her congressional duties to seek treatment for alcohol dependence after a “serious” fall last week. Kirkpatrick, a Democrat whose swing district in southern Arizona has been targeted by Republicans in...
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In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, palliative care nurse Madeleine Mukantagara, 56, left, prays with Vestine Uwizeyimana, 22, right, who has spinal degenerative disease and is taking oral liquid morphine for her pain, as she visits to check on her health at her home in the village of Bushekeli, near Kibogora, in western Rwanda. While people in rich countries are dying from overuse of prescription painkillers, people in Rwanda and other poor countries are suffering from a lack of them, but Rwanda has come up with a solution to its pain crisis - it's morphine, which costs just pennies to produce and is delivered to households across the country by public health workers. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
December 28, 2019 - 9:27 am
BUSHEKELI, Rwanda (AP) — It was something, the silence. Nothing but the puff of her breath and the scuff of her slip-on shoes as Madeleine Mukantagara walked through the fields to her first patient of the day. Piercing cries once echoed down the hill to the road below. What she carried in her bag...
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CORRECTS TO CAPITAL, NOT CAPITOL- In this Nov. 14, 2019 photo, Jamie Cline poses for a photo behind a glass window in a door at the Olympia Bupe Clinic at the Capital Recovery Center in Olympia, Wash., which helps people addicted to heroin and other opiates get prescriptions for buprenorphine, a medicine that prevents withdrawal sickness in people trying to stop using opiates. At the clinic, a doctor is working to spread a philosophy called "medication first," which scraps requirements for counseling, abstinence or even a commitment to recovery in the battle against opioid addiction. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
December 18, 2019 - 2:36 pm
OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Every time she got out of jail, Jamie Cline started hustling again for heroin, driven by an addiction she didn’t understand. “You want to get clean so bad. You know something’s killing you and you can’t stop,” said the 33-year-old who used heroin for 10 years. This spring was...
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This Dec. 12, 2019, photo shows a sign at the Mundipharma International headquarters at Cambridge Science Park in England. Mundipharma is the international affiliate of Purdue Pharma, the maker of the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin. Mundipharma is now marketing Nyxoid, a new brand of naloxone, an opioid overdose reversal medication. (AP Photo/Leila Coker)
December 15, 2019 - 10:06 pm
The gleaming white booth towered over the medical conference in Italy in October, advertising a new brand of antidote for opioid overdoses. “Be prepared. Get naloxone. Save a life,” the slogan on its walls said. Some conference attendees were stunned when they saw the company logo: Mundipharma, the...
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In this Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, photo, a recovering tramadol addict waits for her medication at a de-addiction center in Kapurthala, in the northern Indian state of Punjab. The pills were everywhere, as legitimate medication sold in pharmacies, but also illicit counterfeits hawked by itinerant peddlers and street vendors. India has twice the global average of illicit opiate consumption. Researchers estimate about 4 million Indians use heroin or other opioids, and a quarter of them live in the Punjab, India's agricultural heartland bordering Pakistan. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
December 13, 2019 - 10:53 am
KAPURTHALA, India (AP) — Reports rolled in with escalating urgency — pills seized by the truckload, pills swallowed by schoolchildren, pills in the pockets of dead terrorists. These pills, the world has been told, are safer than the OxyContins, the Vicodins, the fentanyls that have wreaked so much...
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