Agricultural science

FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2008 file photo, a young girl mimics the pose of a Chinese Olympic athletes depicted in Coca-Cola advertising, at the Olympic green in Beijing. The International Life Science Institute, a group funded by the food industry, undermined China’s efforts to keep obesity rates in check by overemphasizing the importance of physical activity rather than dietary restrictions, according to a new paper. The group sponsored obesity conferences on exercise science with speakers including Coke-funded researchers and a Coke executive. ILSI says it does not profess to have been perfect, but that it has adopted stricter guidelines. (AP Photo/Elizabeth Dalziel)
January 10, 2019 - 3:47 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — China's efforts to keep obesity in check have been undermined from the inside by the food industry, according to newly published research. A scholar of Chinese society at Harvard University traced how a group funded by Coca-Cola and other food companies enjoyed close ties to Chinese...
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The 2018 Nobel Chemistry laureate, Frances H. Arnold poses during the traditional Nobel Chair Signing ceremony at the Nobel Museum in Stockholm, Sweden, on Thursday Dec. 6, 2018. (Claudio Brescian/TT via AP)
December 07, 2018 - 5:39 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Winners of this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry say that excessive concerns about genetically modified foods and other substances can inhibit mankind from benefiting from developments in the field. Frances Arnold from the United States and Gregory Winter of Britain made the...
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FILE - In this Oct. 3, 2009 file photo, boaters and fishermen watch as a group of up to six humpback whales feed on herring near Ketchikan, Alaska. Over the past several years researchers have noticed a decline in the number of North Pacific humpback whales showing up in their traditional breeding grounds around Hawaii. The missing humpbacks migrate each autumn from Alaska, where they feed during the summer months, to Hawaii, where they mate and give birth during the winter. (Tom Miller/Ketchikan Daily News via AP, file)
November 28, 2018 - 4:56 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Research into the decline of humpback whale sightings in Hawaii points to a food chain disruption likely caused by warmer ocean temperatures in the whales' feeding grounds in Alaska, federal officials have said. U.S. and international researchers, wildlife managers and federal...
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FILE - This Wednesday, April 19, 2017 file photo shows the beer cooler behind the counter in a convenience store in Sheridan, Ind. In future sweltering years with a double whammy of heat and drought, losses of barley yield can be as much as 17 percent, computer simulations show. And that means “beer prices would, on average, double,” even adjusting for inflation, said a study published in the journal Nature Plants on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
October 15, 2018 - 11:03 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Add beer to chocolate , coffee and wine as some of life's little pleasures that global warming will make scarcer and costlier, scientists say. Increasing bouts of extreme heat waves and drought will hurt production of barley, a key beer ingredient, in the future. Losses of barley...
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This undated image made available by Frank Peairs in 2007 shows a European corn borer. A warmer world likely means more and hungrier insects chomping on crops and less food on dinner plates, a new study suggests. (Frank Peairs/Colorado State University/Bugwood.org via AP)
August 30, 2018 - 2:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study predicts that a warmer world likely means more and hungrier insects chomping on crops and less food on dinner plates. Insects now consume about 10 percent of the globe's food, but the researchers say that will increase to 15 to 20 percent by the end of the century if...
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This undated photo provided by the J.R. Simplot Company shows a sign outside the J.R. Simplot Company in Boise. Idaho-based J.R. Simplot Company has acquired gene editing licensing rights that could one day be used to help farmers produce more crops and grocery store offerings such as strawberries, potatoes and avocados stay fresher longer. The company on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018, announced the agreement with DowDuPont Inc. and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, developers of the nascent gene editing technology. (J.R. Simplot Company via AP)
August 06, 2018 - 1:44 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A multinational agricultural company based in Idaho has acquired gene editing licensing rights that could one day be used to help farmers produce more crops and make grocery store offerings such as strawberries, potatoes and avocados stay fresher longer. J.R. Simplot Company on...
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