Biology

FILE - This May 26, 2009 file photo shows a printout from an electrocardiogram machine in Missouri. Doctors are reporting that novel drugs may offer fresh ways to reduce heart risks beyond the usual medicines to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. One new study found that heart attack survivors benefited from a medicine long used to treat gout. Gene-targeting medicines also showed promise in studies discussed Monday, Nov. 18, 2019, at an American Heart Association conference in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
November 18, 2019 - 3:26 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Novel drugs may offer fresh ways to reduce heart risks beyond the usual medicines to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. One new study found that heart attack survivors benefited from a medicine long used to treat gout. Several experimental drugs also showed early promise for...
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An unmodified, open-pollinated American chestnut bur grows on a tree at the State University of New York's College of Environmental Science & Forestry Lafayette Road Experiment Station in Syracuse, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 30, 2019. The ESF American Chestnut Research & Restoration Project researchers have been able to add a gene to American chestnuts that give the trees resistance to a blight that decimated the trees in the 20th century. (AP Photo/Adrian Kraus)
November 06, 2019 - 4:22 pm
SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) — Chestnuts harvested from high branches on a chilly fall morning look typical: they're marble sized, russet colored and nestled in prickly burs. But many are like no other nuts in nature. In a feat of genetic engineering, about half the chestnuts collected at this college...
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FILE - This 2014 file electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows numerous, spheroid-shaped enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions. Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious and rare illness, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. University of California, San Francisco, researchers tested how the immune system fought back and found clear signs that an enterovirus, a common seasonal virus that specialists have suspected, was indeed the culprit. The the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that AFM spikes coincided with seasons when certain strains of enteroviruses - EV-D68 and EV-A71 - were causing widespread respiratory illnesses. (Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Yiting Zhang/CDC via AP, File)
Associated Press
October 21, 2019 - 11:25 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious illness that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. The paralysis is very rare. U.S. health officials have confirmed 590 cases over the past five years. Finding the cause...
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Professor Gregg Semenza, accompanied by Johns Hopkins University President Ron Daniels, waves to the crowd during a news conference after he was awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine at Johns Hopkins Medicine Hospital in Baltimore, Md., Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. The 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine has been jointly awarded to William Kaelin Jr., Sir Peter Ratcliffe and Gregg Semenza for their pioneering research into how human cells respond to changing oxygen levels. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Associated Press
October 07, 2019 - 8:35 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Two Americans and a British scientist won a Nobel Prize on Monday for discovering details of how the body's cells sense and react to low oxygen levels, providing a foothold for developing new treatments for anemia, cancer and other diseases. Drs. William G. Kaelin Jr. of Harvard...
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This undated photo provided by Johns Hopkins University shows Gregg L. Semenza at the university in Baltimore. Semenza, a Johns Hopkins University researcher, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. He will share the prize with Drs. William G. Kaelin Jr. and Peter J. Ratcliffe for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability, the Nobel Committee announced Monday. (Johns Hopkins University via AP)
October 07, 2019 - 8:48 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology (all times local): 2:40 p.m. Dr. Gregg Semenza, a top researcher at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, says he was awakened by a call from Stockholm shortly before 4 a.m. with the good news that he is one of three...
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October 03, 2019 - 11:54 am
BEDFORD, N.H. (AP) — A young moose that got stuck in a New Hampshire swimming pool has been successfully coaxed out. New Hampshire Fish and Game Department biologists and conservation officers were called to a Bedford home Tuesday to help remove the young bull. He was in the water for several hours...
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FILE -In this Thursday, May 23, 2019, a baby dugong named Marium swims near the hull of a boat off Libong island, Trang province, southern Thailand. A top marine biologist is urging Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an endangered sea mammal, after their death toll for the year has already climbed to a record 21. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP, File)
October 03, 2019 - 5:19 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A top marine biologist has urged Thailand’s government to speed up conservation plans for the dugong, an imperiled sea mammal, after their death toll for the year in Thai waters has already climbed to a record 21. Thon Thamrongnawasawat said on his Facebook page that the carcass of a...
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ADDS THAT THE GROUP HAS PULLED THE VIDEO This image made from the National Academy of Sciences website on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019 shows part of a video of people discussing gene editing and designer babies. The group pulled the video and issued an apology after some criticism. The video gives the inaccurate impression that gene editing can give positive traits without any potential downsides - “the definition of hubris,” said Harvard Medical School dean Dr. George Q. Daley, who also has been involved in academy work. “We are not there yet.” (National Academy of Sciences via AP)
October 02, 2019 - 9:21 pm
A government-funded group that’s leading efforts to set standards for gene editing has pulled a video it posted in the wake of concern about how it portrayed the ethically dicey science and its possible use to make designer babies. The National Academy of Sciences posted the video earlier this week...
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September 27, 2019 - 6:32 am
GENEVA (AP) — An international conservation group is warning that more than half of the trees in Europe that exist nowhere else in the world are threatened with extinction. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature says in their latest assessment of Europe's biodiversity that 58% of...
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September 26, 2019 - 6:21 pm
LOS BANOS, Calif. (AP) — In a story Sept. 25 about swamp rodents, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the Central Valley is an agricultural region 130 miles (210 kilometers) north of Sacramento. The Central Valley region spans about 400 miles (645 kilometers) from Redding to Bakersfield...
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