Climate

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, right, greets German Chancellor Angela Merkel in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday Aug. 22, 2019. Merkel and key Cabinet ministers are meeting their Dutch counterparts Thursday to discuss ways of tackling climate change together, as Germany is set to miss its emissions goals for 2020 by a wide margin.(AP Photo/Mike Corder)
August 22, 2019 - 6:57 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — German Chancellor Angela Merkel and key Cabinet ministers met their Dutch counterparts Thursday to discuss ways of tackling climate change together. The meeting at Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte's official residence comes as Germany is set to miss its emissions goals...
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This satellite image provided by NASA on Aug. 13, 2019 shows several fires burning in the Brazilian Amazon forest. Brazil's National Institute for Space Research, a federal agency monitoring deforestation and wildfires, said the country has seen a record number of wildfires this year, counting 74,155 as of Tuesday, Aug. 20, an 84 percent increase compared to the same period last year. (NASA via AP)
August 21, 2019 - 6:27 pm
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil's official monitoring agency is reporting a sharp increase in wildfires this year, and President Jair Bolsonaro suggested Wednesday, without citing evidence, that non-governmental organizations could be setting them to make him look bad. Brazil's National Institute for...
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In this Aug. 16, 2019, photo, large Icebergs float away as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Scientists are hard at work, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 20, 2019 - 4:34 pm
HELHEIM GLACIER, Greenland (AP) — This is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. New York University air and ocean scientist David Holland, who is tracking what's happening in Greenland from both above and below, calls it "the end of the planet...
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A man stops on his way to the top of what once was the Okjokull glacier, in Iceland, Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019. With poetry, moments of silence and political speeches about the urgent need to fight climate change, Icelandic officials, activists and others bade goodbye to the first Icelandic glacier to disappear. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 18, 2019 - 2:34 pm
OKJOKULL GLACIER, Iceland (AP) — It was a funeral for ice. With poetry, moments of silence and political speeches about the urgent need to fight climate change, Icelandic officials, activists and others bade goodbye to what once was a glacier. Icelandic geologist Oddur Sigurðsson pronounced the...
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Junar Lim takes photos of Ziah Lim, left, and Arsenia Lim, all of Cavite, the Philippines, at gardens in Town Square in Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Alaska recorded its warmest month ever in July and hot, dry weather has continued in Anchorage and much of the region south of the Alaska Range. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
August 17, 2019 - 11:57 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures...
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Junar Lim takes photos of Ziah Lim, left, and Arsenia Lim, all of Cavite, the Philippines, at gardens in Town Square in Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Alaska recorded its warmest month ever in July and hot, dry weather has continued in Anchorage and much of the region south of the Alaska Range. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
August 17, 2019 - 11:49 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures...
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This March 26, 2019 photo shows the water level of the Colorado River, as seen from the Hoover Dam, Ariz. For the seven states that rely on the Colorado River that carries snowmelt from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of California, that means a future with increasingly less water for farms and cities although climate scientists say it's hard to predict how much less. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation on Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, will release its projections for next year's supply from Lake Mead, which feeds Nevada, Arizona and California. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
August 15, 2019 - 2:20 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2014 file photo, what was once a marina sits high and dry due to Lake Mead receding in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Extreme swings in weather are expected as part of a changing climate, something Brad Udall, a water and climate research scientist at Colorado State University, has called "weather whiplash." The drought-stricken Southwest got a reprieve this year with average and above-average snowfall following a year that sent many states into extreme drought. Nearly empty reservoirs quickly rose, including Lake Mead and Lake Powell, the largest man-made reservoirs in the country that hold back Colorado River water. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
August 15, 2019 - 1:53 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
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FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2016 file photo, a bald eagle takes flight at the Museum of the Shenandaoh Valley in Winchester, Va. While once-endangered bald eagles are booming again in the Chesapeake Bay, the overall trajectory of endangered species and the federal act that protects them isn't so clearcut. (Scott Mason/The Winchester Star via AP, File)
August 12, 2019 - 6:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration moved on Monday to weaken how it applies the 45-year-old Endangered Species Act, ordering changes that critics said will speed the loss of animals and plants at a time of record global extinctions . The action, which expands the administration's rewrite of...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2019, file photo, the sun sets in Cuggiono near Milan, Italy. A new U.N. report on warming and land use says climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach. The scientific report on Thursday, Aug. 8, finds that as the world warms it degrades the land more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, File)
August 08, 2019 - 1:42 pm
GENEVA (AP) — Human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the Earth's land and the way people use the land is making global warming worse, a new United Nations scientific report says. That creates a vicious cycle which is already making food more expensive, scarcer and less nutritious. "...
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