Climatology

Valentino Ingraham washes clothing to remove salt and dirt amid the rubble of his mother's property destroyed by Hurricane Dorian in Rocky Creek East End, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Sunday, Sept. 8, 2019. The motors of his family's boats were also destroyed. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
September 10, 2019 - 5:43 am
BERLIN (AP) — A group of leaders from business, politics and science have called for a massive investment in adapting to climate change over the next decade, arguing it would reap significant returns as countries avoid catastrophic losses and boost their economies. The Global Commission on...
Read More
Tony Pagan, left, helps a friend set sandbags in place over a plastic tarp on the back door as they prepare to evacuate before Hurricane Dorian arrives with its storm surge and tropical storm winds, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Tybee Island, Ga. “This is climate change, though President Trump denies that it is,” Pagan, a 69-year-old retired electrician said as he and his wife finished packing to evacuate Wednesday. “He needs to open his eyes.” (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
September 05, 2019 - 5:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly three-quarters of Americans see weather disasters, like Hurricane Dorian, worsening and most of them blame global warming to some extent, a new poll finds. And scientists say they're right. The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey shows 72% of...
Read More
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks at a campaign event, Monday, Sept. 2, 2019, in Hampton Falls, N.H. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
Associated Press
September 04, 2019 - 6:42 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidates are releasing their plans to address climate change ahead of a series of town halls on the issue as the party's base increasingly demands aggressive action. California Sen. Kamala Harris unveiled her plans on Wednesday. New Jersey Sen. Cory...
Read More
This GOES-16, GeoColor satellite image taken Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019, at 17:10 UTC and provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), shows Hurricane Dorian moving off the east coast of Florida in the Atlantic Ocean. (NOAA via AP)
September 03, 2019 - 3:16 pm
Hurricane Dorian is finally moving. But for a day-and-half it just sat on and pounded Grand Bahama Island because nothing high up in the atmosphere was making it budge. That meteorological gridlock, which slows or stalls storms, is happening more often in a warming world, studies show. Before...
Read More
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont, talks to reporters as he tours a mobile home park that was destroyed by last year's wildfire in Paradise, Calif., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019. Sanders released a $16.3 trillion climate plan Thursday that builds on the Green New Deal and calls for the United States to move to renewable energy across the economy by 2050 and declare climate change a national emergency. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
Associated Press
August 22, 2019 - 5:55 pm
PARADISE, Calif. (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders released a $16.3 trillion climate plan on Thursday before touring a Northern California town ravaged by wildfire, declaring the setting a "wake-up call for our entire nation" to the dangers of a warming planet. "Climate change...
Read More
In this Aug. 16, 2019, photo, large Icebergs float away as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Scientists are hard at work, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 20, 2019 - 4:34 pm
HELHEIM GLACIER, Greenland (AP) — This is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. New York University air and ocean scientist David Holland, who is tracking what's happening in Greenland from both above and below, calls it "the end of the planet...
Read More
Junar Lim takes photos of Ziah Lim, left, and Arsenia Lim, all of Cavite, the Philippines, at gardens in Town Square in Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Alaska recorded its warmest month ever in July and hot, dry weather has continued in Anchorage and much of the region south of the Alaska Range. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
August 17, 2019 - 11:57 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures...
Read More
Junar Lim takes photos of Ziah Lim, left, and Arsenia Lim, all of Cavite, the Philippines, at gardens in Town Square in Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Alaska recorded its warmest month ever in July and hot, dry weather has continued in Anchorage and much of the region south of the Alaska Range. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
August 17, 2019 - 11:49 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures...
Read More
This March 26, 2019 photo shows the water level of the Colorado River, as seen from the Hoover Dam, Ariz. For the seven states that rely on the Colorado River that carries snowmelt from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of California, that means a future with increasingly less water for farms and cities although climate scientists say it's hard to predict how much less. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation on Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, will release its projections for next year's supply from Lake Mead, which feeds Nevada, Arizona and California. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
August 15, 2019 - 2:20 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
Read More
FILE - In this July 16, 2014 file photo, what was once a marina sits high and dry due to Lake Mead receding in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Extreme swings in weather are expected as part of a changing climate, something Brad Udall, a water and climate research scientist at Colorado State University, has called "weather whiplash." The drought-stricken Southwest got a reprieve this year with average and above-average snowfall following a year that sent many states into extreme drought. Nearly empty reservoirs quickly rose, including Lake Mead and Lake Powell, the largest man-made reservoirs in the country that hold back Colorado River water. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
August 15, 2019 - 1:53 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
Read More

Pages