Courts

FILE - In this April 7, 2020 file photo, voters observe social distancing guidelines as they wait in line to cast ballots in the presidential primary election in Milwaukee. More than 50 people who voted in person or worked the polls during Wisconsin's election earlier this month have tested positive for COVID-19 so far. But there are no plans to move or otherwise alter a special congressional election coming in less than two weeks. (AP Photo/Morry Gash File)
April 29, 2020 - 3:08 pm
MADISON, Wis. (AP) — There are no plans to postpone or otherwise alter a special congressional election in Wisconsin that is less than two weeks away, even though more than 50 people who voted in person or worked the polls during the state's presidential primary this month have tested positive for...
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A man wearing a mask sits next the coffin of his mother as he's transported by a cemetery worker in a full protection suit to her burial site at the Nossa Senhora das Gracas cemetery in Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, April 27, 2020. The woman's body was previously being held in a refrigerator for confirmed and suspected victims of of COVID-19, according to the administration of the cemetery. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
April 28, 2020 - 4:07 pm
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — As Brazil careens toward a full-blown public health emergency and economic meltdown, President Jair Bolsonaro has managed to add a third ingredient to the toxic mix: political crisis. Even if it doesn’t speed his downfall, it will render Brazilians more vulnerable to the...
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FILE - In this June 24, 2019 file photo, the empty courtroom is seen at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. Because of the coronavirus pandemic the Supreme Court is holding arguments by phone for the first time in its 230-year history. Attorneys say the teleconference arguments in 10 cases over six days present a range of challenges. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
April 28, 2020 - 3:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — On the evening before he was to argue a case before the Supreme Court years ago, Jeffrey Fisher broke his glasses. That left the very nearsighted lawyer with an unappealing choice. He could wear contacts and clearly see the justices but not his notes, or skip the contacts and see...
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A National Civil Police Special Forces officer patrols past a mural of Armando Bukele, father of El Salvador's President Nayib Bukele, which was painted by supporters of the president outside a cultural center as a thank you gesture for creating the center when he was mayor, during the enforcement of the coronavirus-related quarantine, in the Iberia area of San Salvador, El Salvador, Thursday, April 23, 2020. When the coronavirus appeared, President Bukele closed the borders and airports and imposed a mandatory home quarantine for all except those working in the government, hospitals, pharmacies or other designated businesses. People were allowed out only to buy groceries, and violators were detained, with more than 2,000 being held for 30-day stints. (AP Photo/Salvador Melendez)
April 28, 2020 - 12:11 pm
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador (AP) — The most popular leader in Latin America is a slender, casually dressed millennial with an easy manner on Twitter and a harsh approach that critics call increasingly frightening. As his first year in power comes to a close, El Salvador President Nayib Bukele is...
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FILE - In this Jan. 20, 2020, file photo, a woman walks before dawn in Toksook Bay, Alaska, a mostly Yup'ik village on the edge of the Bering Sea. A judge has ruled in favor of tribal nations in their bid to keep Alaska Native corporations from getting a share of $8 billion in coronavirus relief funding — at least for now. In a decision issued late Monday, April 27, 2020, U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta in Washington, D.C., said the U.S. Treasury Department could begin disbursing funding to 574 federally recognized tribes to respond to the coronavirus but not to the corporations .(AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
April 28, 2020 - 1:06 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — A judge has ruled in favor of tribal nations in their bid to keep Alaska Native corporations from getting a share of $8 billion in coronavirus relief funding — at least for now. In a decision issued late Monday, U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta in Washington, D.C., said the U...
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April 27, 2020 - 5:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Monday against the state of Georgia in a copyright lawsuit over annotations to its legal code, finding they cannot be copyrighted. The 5-4 ruling splintered the court along unusual lines and upholds a previous appeals court decision. “The Copyright Act...
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FILE - In this June 20, 2019, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court is sidestepping a major decision on gun rights in a dispute over New York City’s former ban on transporting guns. The justices ruled Monday that there’s nothing left for them to decide now that the city has eased restrictions on taking licensed, locked and unloaded guns outside the city limits and a new state law prevents New York from reviving the ban. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
Associated Press
April 27, 2020 - 4:41 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court sidestepped a major decision on gun rights Monday in a dispute over New York City’s former ban on transporting guns. The justices threw out a challenge from gun rights groups, including the National Rifle Association's New York affiliate. The court ruled that the...
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FILE - In this March 17, 2020, file photo a poll worker at the Su Nueva Lavanderia polling place uses rubber gloves as she enters a ballot in the ballot box in Chicago. A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds Democrats are now much more likely than Republicans to support their state conducting elections exclusively by mail, 47% to 29%. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)
Associated Press
April 27, 2020 - 1:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans’ support for mail-in voting has jumped amid concerns about the safety of polling places during the coronavirus pandemic, but a wide partisan divide suggests President Donald Trump’s public campaign against vote by mail may be resonating with his Republican backers. A new...
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FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2019 file photo, the Supreme Court is seen at sunset in Washington. The Supreme Court has ruled that insurance companies can collect $12 billion from the federal government to cover their losses in the early years of the health care law championed by President Barack Obama. The justices voted 8-1 Monday in holding that insurers are entitled to the money under a provision of the “Obamacare” health law that promised the companies a financial cushion for losses they might incur by selling coverage to people in the marketplaces created by the health care law. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
April 27, 2020 - 10:28 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Monday that insurance companies can collect $12 billion from the federal government to cover their losses in the early years of the health care law championed by President Barack Obama. Insurers are entitled to the money under a provision of the “Obamacare...
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FILE - In this April 2, 2020 file photo, "For Sale By Owner" and "Closed Due to Virus" signs are displayed in the window of a store in Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich. Business filings under Chapter 11 of the federal bankruptcy law rose sharply in March, and attorneys who work with struggling companies are seeing signs that more owners are contemplating the possibility of bankruptcy. Government aid my simply be too little too late. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
AP News
April 26, 2020 - 12:24 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The billions of dollars in coronavirus relief targeted at small businesses may not prevent many of them from ending up in bankruptcy court. Business filings under Chapter 11 of the federal bankruptcy law rose sharply in March, and attorneys who work with struggling companies are...
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