Diagnosis and treatment

In this Monday, July 23, 2018, photo as Brooke Adams, 5, comes back from a seizure, her mother Jana calms her after administering a cannabis-based medication (CBD) and oxygen at their home in Santa Rosa, Calif. A judge says the California kindergartner can keep bringing a cannabis-based drug used for emergency treatment of a rare form of epilepsy to her public school. The Santa Rosa Press-Democrat reported that a judge sided Friday, Sept. 21, 2018, with the family of the child. The Rincon Valley Union School District in Santa Rosa sought to ban the ointment because it contains the active ingredient in marijuana. (Kent Porter/The Press Democrat via AP)
September 22, 2018 - 10:02 pm
SANTA ROSA, Calif. (AP) — A California kindergartner can keep bringing a cannabis-based drug used for emergency treatment of a rare form of epilepsy to her public school, a judge ruled Friday. The Santa Rosa Press-Democrat reported that a judge sided with the family of 5-year-old Brooke Adams. The...
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In this Sept. 8, 2018 photo, 42-year-old dialysis patient Sandra Medina waits inside a plane at the airport in Vieques, Puerto Rico. After Hurricane Maria hit, authorities began flying kidney patients in Vieques to the Puerto Rican mainland. The storm had ruined the only dialysis center on this tiny island; without treatment, the patients would die. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)
September 19, 2018 - 8:08 am
VIEQUES, Puerto Rico (AP) — As weeks turned into months, the seats of the small plane began to empty out. In the beginning, 15 passengers flew from Vieques to the Puerto Rican mainland — refugees from Hurricane Maria. The storm had ruined the only dialysis center on this tiny island, their home;...
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September 17, 2018 - 8:00 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A part-owner and operator of medical marijuana dispensaries in Oregon was sentenced to seven months in prison Monday, marking what a prosecutor called the country's first federal sentencing of a legal pot business owner for tax crimes. Matthew Price also was ordered to pay $...
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September 17, 2018 - 12:43 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal watchdog agency says thousands of foster kids may be getting powerful psychiatric drugs prescribed to them without basic safeguards. The report due Monday from the Health and Human Services inspector general's office finds a failure to care for youngsters whose lives...
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In this photo taken on Friday, Sept. 7, 2018, Pyotr Verzilov, a member of the feminist protest group Pussy Riot speaks during an interview to the Associated Press in Moscow, Russia. Verzilov is reported Wednesday Sept. 12, 2018, to have been admitted to hospital allegedly after a suspected poisoning attack, and his medical condition is not yet known. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
September 13, 2018 - 10:12 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Doctors say a hospitalized member of protest group Pussy Riot may have been poisoned by an overdose of medication. Independent news website Meduza reported Thursday that Pyotr Verzilov's doctors told his relatives that he either overdosed on medicine or was given too much medicine...
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FILE - This undated fluorescence-colored microscope image made available by the National Institutes of Health in September 2016 shows a culture of human breast cancer cells. On Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018, scientists reported they've found a new way to determine whether specific genetic abnormalities are likely to make people sick, a step toward avoiding a vexing uncertainty that can surround DNA test results. (Ewa Krawczyk/National Cancer Institute via AP)
September 12, 2018 - 5:29 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've found a new way to help determine whether specific genetic abnormalities are likely to make people sick, a step toward avoiding a vexing uncertainty that can surround DNA test results. Researchers used genetic engineering to create thousands of tiny variations...
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The Rev. John Sabbagh, left, and his son Ebby Sabbagh hugs nurse practitioner Kim O'Riley, Friday, Sept. 7, 2018 in Gilbert, Ariz. Thirty-five years after a Mesa man cared for his son when he was shot in their native Lebanon, the son is returning that devotion. Both the Rev. John Ibraham Sabbagh and his 54-year-old son, Ebby Sabbagh, are celebrating one year of going strong since the elder Sabbagh received a crucial stem-cell transplant. (AP Photo/Terry Tang)
September 10, 2018 - 5:58 pm
GILBERT, Ariz. (AP) — Thirty-five years after an Arizona man cared for his son when he was shot in their native Lebanon, the son is returning that devotion. Both the Rev. John Ibraham Sabbagh and his 54-year-old son, Ebby Sabbagh, are celebrating one year of going strong since the elder Sabbagh...
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FILE - In this Feb. 23, 2017, file photo, Olivia Newton-John performs during the Viña del Mar International Song Festival at the Quinta Vergara in Viña del Mar, Chile. Newton-John said she has been diagnosed with cancer for the third time in three decades. The four-time Grammy winner, who will turn 70 on Sept. 26, told Australian news program “Sunday Night” doctors found a tumor in her lower back in 2017. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix, File)
September 10, 2018 - 11:04 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Olivia Newton-John says she has been diagnosed with cancer for the third time in three decades. The four-time Grammy winner, who will turn 70 on Sept. 26, told Australian news program "Sunday Night" doctors found a tumor in her lower back in 2017. Newton-John says she's "treating...
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This undated photo provided by Intermountain Healthcare in September 2015 shows Dan Liljenquist, chairman of the Civica Rx board. This new generic drug company, launched by several major hospital groups on Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018, plans to tackle chronic shortages and high prices of widely used medications. (Intermountain Healthcare via AP)
September 06, 2018 - 12:11 am
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Several major hospital groups Thursday launched their own generic drug company to tackle chronic shortages and high prices. The new company, Civica Rx, plans to start with 14 widely used hospital drugs long in short supply. The company isn't disclosing the drugs' names for...
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In this Monday, Aug. 13, 2018 photo, Brian Madeux interacts with research nurse Chrishauna Lacy at his home in New River, Ariz. Madeux was the first person in the world to participate in a gene editing attempt in his body, for the inherited disease Hunter syndrome. Early partial results from the study were released on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt York)
September 05, 2018 - 8:58 am
PHOENIX (AP) — Early, partial results from a historic gene editing study give encouraging signs that the treatment may be safe and having at least some of its hoped-for effect, but it's too soon to know whether it ultimately will succeed. The results announced Wednesday are from the first human...
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