Environmental science

In this Friday, April 24, 2020 photo provide by the Alfred Wegener Insitute shows the German Arctic research vessel Polarstern in the ice next to a research camp in the Arctic region. Dozens of scientists are waiting in quarantine for the all-clear to join a year-long Arctic research mission aimed at improving the models used for forecasting climate change, just as the expedition reaches a crucial phase. For a while, the international mission looked like it might have to be called off, as country after country went into lockdown because of the virus, scuppering plans to bring fresh supplies and crew to the German research vessel Polarstern that's been moored in the high Arctic since last year. (Manuel Ernst/Alfred-Wegner-Institut via AP)
May 10, 2020 - 4:07 am
BERLIN (AP) — They prepared for icy cold and trained to be on the watch for polar bears, but a pandemic just wasn't part of the program. Now dozens of scientists are waiting in quarantine for the all-clear to join a year-long Arctic research mission aimed at improving the models used for...
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Gen Nashimoto, of Luminalt, installs solar panels in Hayward, Calif., on Wednesday, April 29, 2020. From New York to California, the U.S renewable energy industry is reeling from the new coronavirus pandemic, which has delayed construction and sowed doubts about major projects on the drawing board. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
May 02, 2020 - 10:57 am
The U.S. renewable energy industry is reeling from the new coronavirus pandemic, which has delayed construction and sowed doubts about major projects on the drawing board. As many as 120,000 jobs in solar and 35,000 in wind could be lost, trade groups say. Leaders are confident the future is bright...
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This March 31, 2018 photo provided by researcher A. Park Williams shows the Catalina Mountains in southern Arizona. A two-decade-long dry spell that has parched much of the western United States is turning into one of the deepest megadroughts in the region in more than 1,200 years, and about half of this historic drought can be blamed on man-made global warming, according to a study released Thursday, April 16, 2020 in the journal Science. (A. Park Williams/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory via AP)
April 16, 2020 - 2:10 pm
KENSINGTON, Maryland (AP) — A two-decade-long dry spell that has parched much of the western United States is turning into one of the deepest megadroughts in the region in more than 1,200 years, a new study found. And about half of this historic drought can be blamed on man-made global warming,...
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FILE - In this April 9, 2020, file photo, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, appears at a news conference about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. Suddenly expertise matters. In the time of coronavirus, America turns its worried eyes to Dr. Fauci and other experts. That's a big shift after decades of the public and its leaders downplaying the advice from scientists and other experts on everything from climate change to disaster planning.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
April 12, 2020 - 6:02 pm
An invisible enemy is killing thousands and forcing people worldwide to cower behind closed doors. Unfounded conspiracy theories and miracle “cures” abound on social media. Politicians and pundits send mixed messages about how to protect yourself. Who you gonna call? As the coronavirus rampages,...
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FILE - This June 1, 2019, file photo provided by the Center for Biological Diversity, shows the rare desert wildflower Tiehm's buckwheat in the Silver Peak Range about 120 miles southeast of Reno, Nev. An Australian mining company says its pursuit of a huge lithium deposit in Nevada is critical to accelerating the manufacture of electric vehicles and reducing greenhouse gases. Opponents argue the mine can't be built without causing the extinction of the only native population of the rare desert wildflower known to exist in the world. (Patrick Donnelly/Center for Biological Diversity via AP, File)
March 07, 2020 - 12:26 pm
RENO, Nev. (AP) — The rare Tiehm's buckwheat stands less than a foot tall (30 centimeters) in Nevada's rocky high desert, its thin, leafless stems adorned with tiny yellow flowers in spring. To the Australian company that wants to mine lithium beneath the federal land where it grows, the perennial...
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FILE - In this April 30, 2015 file photo, a man fishes along the receding banks of the Salton Sea near Bombay Beach, Calif. Scientists say that half of the world's sandy beached are at risk of disappearing by the end of the century if climate changes continues unchecked. Researchers at the European Union's Joint Research Center in Ispra, Italy, used satellite images to track the way beaches changed over the past 30 years and project how global warming might affect them in the future. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
March 02, 2020 - 11:03 am
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say that half of the world's sandy beaches could disappear by the end of the century if climate change continues unchecked. Researchers at the European Union's Joint Research Center in Ispra, Italy, used satellite images to track the way beaches have changed over the past...
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In this handout photo taken in Jan. 2020 and provided by Nekton, scientists lower the “Limiting Factor” submarine into the Mediterranean Sea, part of sea trials before the next stage of the Nekton Mission begins in mid-March. A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean - into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches, but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in the unexplored area. (Nekton via AP)
February 05, 2020 - 12:37 pm
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean — into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in...
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In this Jan. 11, 2020 photo a man photographs waves crashing onto the cliffs at Rodea Point in Lincoln County, Ore. during an extreme high tide that coincided with a big winter storm. Amateur scientists are whipping out their smartphones to document the effects of extreme high tides on shore lines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels due to climate change will mean for coastal communities around the world. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
February 05, 2020 - 1:09 am
DEPOE BAY, Ore. (AP) — Tourists, nature lovers and amateur scientists are whipping out their cameras to document the effects of extreme high tides on shorelines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels will mean for coastal communities...
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This December 2019 photo provided by Guy Ballard shows a male brush-tailed rock wallaby eating supplementary food researchers provided in the Oxley Wild Rivers National Park in New South Wales, Australia. Before this fire season, scientists estimated there were as few as 15,000 left in the wild. Now recent fires in a region already stricken by drought have burned through some of their last habitat, and the species is in jeopardy of disappearing, Ballard said. (Guy Ballard/NSW DPI - UNE via AP)
January 18, 2020 - 7:35 am
Australia’s unprecedented wildfires season has so far charred 40,000 square miles (104,000 square kilometers) of brushland, rainforests, and national parks — killing by one estimate more than a billion wild animals. Scientists fear some of the island continent’s unique and colorful species may not...
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FILE - In this Nov. 1, 2019, file photo, flames from a backfire consume a hillside as firefighters battle the Maria Fire in Santa Paula, Calif. The decade that just ended was by far the hottest ever measured on Earth, capped off by the second-warmest year on record, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
January 15, 2020 - 11:55 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The decade that just ended was by far the hottest ever measured on Earth, capped off by the second-warmest year on record, two U.S. agencies reported Wednesday. And scientists said they see no end to the way man-made climate change keeps shattering records. “If you think you've...
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