Financial industry regulation

FILE - This April 22, 2005, file photo, shows logos for MasterCard and Visa credit cards at the entrance of a New York coffee shop. Visa and Mastercard are dropping out of Facebook’s Libra project, a potentially fatal blow to the social network’s plan for a worldwide digital currency, Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
October 12, 2019 - 8:05 am
Facebook faces a rough road ahead with Libra, but defections by high-profile partners are still unlikely to spell the end for the digital currency. On Friday, Visa and MasterCard announced their departures from the Libra project, as did e-commerce giant eBay and payments startup Stripe. Last week,...
Read More
October 10, 2019 - 3:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve has approved a package of rules that will ease restrictions imposed on banks following the 2008 financial crisis, giving a victory to the banking industry and President Donald Trump, a vocal critic of the more stringent rules. The Fed's rule changes approved...
Read More
FILE - In this April 11, 2018, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election and data privacy. Attorney General William Barr wants Facebook to give law enforcement a way to read encrypted messages sent by users, re-igniting tensions between tech companies and law enforcement. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
October 09, 2019 - 3:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will appear before Congress this month as the tech giant is under pressure from lawmakers and regulators over its massive market power and record of privacy breaches. Rep. Maxine Waters, the California Democrat who heads the House Financial Services...
Read More
In this, Monday, Oct. 7, 2019 photo, David Schaecter, president of the Holocaust Survivors Foundation USA (HSF), gestures as he speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Aventura, Fla. Aging Holocaust survivors are trying to recover insurance benefits that were never honored by Nazi-era companies, which could be worth billions of dollars. The companies have demanded original paperwork, such as death certificates, that were not available after World War II. The survivors want to take insurance companies to court in the U.S. to recover the money, but it would take an act of Congress to allow it. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
October 08, 2019 - 5:00 pm
AVENTURA, Fla. (AP) — When David Schaecter was a child in Slovakia in the 1930s, he counted more than 100 people in his extended family. By the end of World War II, he alone survived. The rest had been killed in Nazi concentration camps or by roving SS death squads. Schaecter lost not only his...
Read More
FILE - In this July 17, 2019 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks about his "Medicare for All" proposal at George Washington University in Washington. Sanders had a heart attack, his campaign confirmed Friday, Oct. 4, as the Vermont senator was released from a Nevada hospital. Sanders' campaign released a statement from the 78-year-old's Las Vegas doctors that said the senator was stable when he arrived Tuesday at Desert Springs Hospital Medical Center. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Associated Press
October 07, 2019 - 6:00 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Bernie Sanders is unveiling a major campaign finance plan, continuing his 2020 presidential bid even as he's at home recuperating from a heart attack. The Vermont senator said Monday that as president he'd enact mandatory public financing laws for all federal elections and ban...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 2, 2014 file photo, a Fiat logo pictured on a car in Milan, Italy. Fiat Chrysler has agreed to pay $40 million to settle a complaint by securities regulators that it misled investors by overstating monthly sales numbers. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni, File)
September 27, 2019 - 1:54 pm
DETROIT (AP) — Fiat Chrysler is paying $40 million to settle with U.S. securities regulators who say the automaker misled investors by overstating its monthly sales numbers over a five-year period. The Italian-American company inflated sales by paying dealers to report fake numbers from 2012 to...
Read More
Secretary of Labor nominee Eugene Scalia speaks during his nomination hearing on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
September 26, 2019 - 3:46 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican-led Senate has confirmed lawyer Eugene Scalia, a son of the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, as President Donald Trump's new labor secretary. The Senate voted Thursday along party lines, 53-44, to approve the nomination. Scalia spent much of his career as...
Read More
September 26, 2019 - 3:31 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Dutch bank ABN AMRO says it is under investigation for possible breaches of the Netherlands' money laundering and terrorism financing legislation. The bank announced the probe in a short statement Thursday and said it will cooperate fully with investigators. Earlier...
Read More
FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 file photo, Financial information is displayed on screens and a ticker inside the London Stock Exchange in the City of London. The London Stock Exchange is rejecting an unsolicited takeover bid from its Hong Kong counterpart, citing “fundamental concerns” about the offer. The London Stock Exchange said Friday, Sept. 13, 2019 that it sees “no merit” in going forward with the offer because of the concerns. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, file)
September 13, 2019 - 10:07 am
LONDON (AP) — The London Stock Exchange on Friday rejected an unsolicited takeover bid from its Hong Kong counterpart, citing "fundamental concerns" about the offer. The London Stock Exchange Group said strategic and regulatory problems were among the reasons it turned down the unexpected proposal...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 31, 2019, file photo, Fresno State quarterback Jorge Reyna, left, looks to throw a pass as Southern California USC Trojans defensive lineman Christian Rector approaches during an NCAA college football game in Los Angeles. The NCAA’s Board of Governors is urging Gov. Gavin Newsom not to sign a California bill that would allow college athletes to receive money for their names, likenesses or images. In a six-paragraph letter to Newsom, the board said the bill would give California schools an unfair recruiting advantage. As a result, the letter says, the NCAA would declare those schools ineligible for its events. (AP Photo/Kyusung Gong, File)
September 11, 2019 - 9:14 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Athletes at California colleges could hire agents and sign endorsement deals under a bill the state Legislature sent to the governor Wednesday, setting up a potential confrontation with the NCAA that could jeopardize the athletic futures of powerhouse programs like USC,...
Read More

Pages