Fish

Lionfish, lured by a sheet of plastic lattice, swim near a trap offshore near Destin, Fla., on July 6, 2018. Scientists are looking at traps as a better way to kill the beautiful but brutally destructive invaders with huge appetites than shooting them one by one with spearguns. Traps could also be used at depths spearfishers cannot reach. (Alexander Fogg/Destin – Fort Walton Beach via AP)
August 26, 2020 - 2:21 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The quest is on for a better way to kill beautiful but brutally destructive lionfish than shooting them one by one with spearguns. The voracious invaders with huge appetites, flashy stripes and a mane of venomous spines are a problem in the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico and the...
Read More
FILE - In this July 13, 2007, file photo, workers with the Pebble Mine project test drill in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska, near the village of Iliamma. A proposed gold and copper mine at the headwaters of the world's largest sockeye salmon fishery in Alaska would cause "unavoidable adverse impacts," the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said in a letter to the developer released Monday, Aug. 24, 2020. The corps is asking the backers of Pebble Mine to come up with a mitigation plan within 90 days for nearly 3,000 acres of land and nearly 200 miles of streams it says could be affected if the controversial mine moves forward. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)
August 24, 2020 - 2:50 pm
ANCHORAGE, ALASKA (AP) — A proposed gold and copper mine at the headwaters of the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery in Alaska would cause “unavoidable adverse impacts,” the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said in a letter to the developer released Monday. The corps is giving Pebble Limited...
Read More
August 22, 2020 - 7:52 pm
The Trump administration plans to block a proposed copper and gold mine near the headwaters of a major U.S. salmon fishery in Alaska, six people described as familiar with its plans told Politico on Saturday. The administration's rejection of the Pebble Mine project is expected to come after Trump...
Read More
August 20, 2020 - 3:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Accounts of abusive conditions and forced labor have prompted the U.S. to ban imports from a Taiwan-based fishing vessel that reportedly has supplied the global tuna trading company that acquired Bumble Bee Seafoods this year. U.S. Customs and Border Protection issued the order...
Read More
Edward Murat, 20, carries his inner tube to the beach for a day of open sea fishing at Playa Escondida in La Guaira, Venezuela, Friday, Aug. 14, 2020. Survival during the new coronavirus pandemic has forced a small but growing number of people in the coastal town to turn to fishing the high sea on salvaged inner tubes. (AP Photo/Matias Delacroix)
August 15, 2020 - 8:34 pm
LA GUAIRA, Venezuela (AP) — The biggest fear is a fishhook puncturing the inner tube that keeps them afloat far from shore. Then come sharks grabbing their catch and maybe biting their legs. And the current that threatens to pull them out to sea. A small but growing number of people in the coastal...
Read More
FILE - In this April 24, 2008, file photo, a sea lion eats a salmon in the Columbia River near Bonneville Dam in North Bonneville, Wash. Federal authorities on Friday, Aug. 14, 2020, granted permission for Washington state, Oregon and several Native American tribes to begin killing hundreds of salmon-hungry sea lions in the Columbia River and its tributaries over the next five years. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)
August 14, 2020 - 5:05 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — U.S. authorities on Friday gave wildlife managers in Washington, Oregon and Idaho permission to start killing hundreds of sea lions in the Columbia River basin in hopes of helping struggling salmon and steelhead trout. The bulky marine mammals long ago figured out that they could...
Read More
This January 2020 photo provided by the Center for Biological Diversity shows construction on a new border wall in the wetlands at the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Arizona. The federal agency in charge of the refuge warned for several months that pumping water to build a border wall would decimate the habitat, and correspondence obtained by two environmental groups shows that U.S. Customs and Border Protection ignored most of those warnings and pulled water from wells so close to the refuge that some of its ponds went dry. (Laiken Jordahl/Center for Biological Diversity via AP)
August 14, 2020 - 2:51 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — The agency in charge of building the border wall received repeated warnings: tap water from nearby wells, and the unique wetlands of southeastern Arizona — yes, Arizona — home to a variety of wildlife and endangered fish will go dry. Immigration officials didn’t head those warnings...
Read More
August 03, 2020 - 9:51 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal appeals court in New Orleans has upheld a decision that throws out rules regulating fish farms in the Gulf of Mexico. The law granting authority over fisheries to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration does not also let the agency set rules for offshore...
Read More
In this May 15, 2019, file photo, the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River is seen from the air near Colfax, Washington. The federal government said Friday, July 31, 2020, four giant dams on the Snake River in Washington state will not be removed to help endangered salmon migrate to the ocean. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
July 31, 2020 - 3:17 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The U.S. government announced Friday that four huge dams on the Snake River in Washington state will not be removed to help endangered salmon migrate to the ocean. The decision thwarts the desires of environmental groups that fought for two decades to breach the structures...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 11, 2016, file photo, a great white shark tries to bite a fish head being trolled though the water as researchers chum the ocean looking for sharks off the coast of Gansbaai, South Africa. Seals are thriving off the Northeast United States coast thanks to decades of protections. That victory for wildlife has brought a consequence for humans: more encounters with sharks. The Monday, July 27, 2020, death of swimmer Julie Dimperio Holowach, who was killed by a great white off Harpswell, Maine, might have happened because the shark mistook her for a seal, authorities said. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam, File)
July 30, 2020 - 8:04 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Seals are thriving off the Northeast coast thanks to decades of protections, and that victory for wildlife has brought a consequence for humans — more encounters with sharks. Seals are a favorite prey of large sharks such as the great white. The death this week of swimmer...
Read More

Pages