Food manufacturing

In this July 11, 2018 photo, animal geneticist Alison Van Eenennaam of the University of California, Davis, points to a group of dairy calves that won’t have to be de-horned thanks to gene editing. The calves are descended from a bull genetically altered to be hornless, and the company behind the work, Recombinetics, says gene-edited traits could ease animal suffering and improve productivity. (AP Photo/Haven Daley)
November 15, 2018 - 7:52 am
OAKFIELD, N.Y. (AP) — Cows that can withstand hotter temperatures. Cows born without pesky horns. Pigs that never reach puberty. A company wants to alter farm animals by adding and subtracting genetic traits in a lab. It sounds like science fiction, but Recombinetics sees opportunity for its...
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November 14, 2018 - 4:40 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Food safety officials are stressing the importance of proper handling and cooking practices amid a nationwide outbreak of drug-resistant Salmonella found in raw turkey, with Thanksgiving approaching. The Centers for Disease Control last week said the number of reported illnesses...
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Fred Gmitter, a geneticist at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, right, visits a citrus grower in an orange grove affected by citrus greening disease in Fort Meade, Fla., on Sept. 27, 2018. "If we can go in and edit the gene, change the DNA sequence ever so slightly by one or two letters, potentially we'd have a way to defeat this disease," says Gmitter. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)
November 14, 2018 - 4:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart. By early next year, the first foods from plants or animals that had their DNA "edited" are...
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This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018 photo shows part of an ingredient label, which lists "artificial flavoring," on a packet of candy in New York. In November 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has decided to give companies two years to purge their products of the six ingredients, described only as “artificial flavors” on packages. The words “artificial flavor” or “natural flavor” refer to any of thousands of ingredients. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)
November 13, 2018 - 11:28 am
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators are giving food companies two years to remove six artificial flavors from their products, even though they say the ingredients are safe in the trace amounts used. The move highlights tension between consumer advocates, who want to know more about what exactly is in...
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In this Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018, photo Lauren Ray pets her 9-month-old dog Bear in her Milwaukee home. Ray says she is happy to hear Petco is announcing Tuesday, Nov. 13, that it plans to stop selling dog and cat food and treats with artificial colors, flavors and preservatives, both online and at its 1,500 stores in the U.S. and Puerto Rico by May 2019. She feeds her dog organic food and hopes Petco's change will help her find more varieties at a convenient location. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)
November 13, 2018 - 5:21 am
Demand for healthy, natural food is extending from humans to their pets. Petco announced Tuesday it will stop selling dog and cat food and treats with artificial colors, flavors and preservatives, both online and at its nearly 1,500 stores in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. "We are making sure we are...
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A police van thought to be carrying Croatian tycoon Ivica Todoric arrives to Zagreb central prison, in Zagreb, Croatia, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018. British authorities have extradited the founder of an indebted food and retail company who was Croatia's most-wanted fugitive. (AP Photo/Darko Bandic)
November 07, 2018 - 4:37 pm
ZAGREB, Croatia (AP) — British authorities on Wednesday extradited Ivica Todoric, the founder of a deeply indebted food and retail company, to Croatia in a case that has shaken the Balkans. A year after Todoric was detained in London on embezzlement charges, the 67-year-old landed in Zagreb on a...
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This undated product image provided by Ben & Jerry’s shows the rebranded ice cream flavor Pecan Resist. Ben & Jerry’s says it’s taking a stand against what it calls the Trump administration’s regressive policies with the ice cream flavor. The company and its founders are unveiling the limited batch ice cream flavor Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018, in Washington ahead of the mid-term elections. (Ben & Jerry’s via AP)
October 30, 2018 - 1:31 pm
MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Ice cream maker Ben & Jerry's is taking a stand against what it calls the Trump administration's regressive policies by rebranding one of its flavors Pecan Resist. The company and its founders unveiled the limited batch ice cream flavor Pecan Resist Tuesday in Washington...
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In this Sept. 24, 2018, a sign posted on a drink cooler in a store gives information about a soda tax that took effect in January, in Seattle. In the wake of Seattle's new tax on sugary beverages, a group backed by millions of dollars from the soda industry will ask voters in November whether to prevent other cities and counties in Washington from following suit. Under Initiative 1634, local governments would no longer be able to impose their own taxes on sodas, other sugary beverages and on food items. (AP Photo/Lisa Baumann)
October 24, 2018 - 3:23 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Soda industry giants including the Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo, Inc. are spending more than $20 million to convince voters in Washington state to pass an initiative that would block local governments from imposing taxes on soda, sugary beverages and some food items. The effort follows...
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October 19, 2018 - 1:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — New York City has announced a national effort to reduce sugar in packaged foods by 20 percent. The city's health department said Friday the endeavor is being undertaken by the National Salt and Sugar Reduction Initiative, a partnership of about 100 health departments and related...
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FILE - In this June 30, 2008 file photo a StarKist brand product is seen on a grocery store shelf in Boston. Authorities say StarKist has agreed to plead guilty to price fixing as part of a broad collusion investigation of the industry. Federal prosecutors announced the plea agreement Thursday and said the company faces a maximum fine of $100 million. Bumble Bee Foods last year pleaded guilty to the same charge and paid a $25 million fine. (AP Photo/Lisa Poole,File)
October 18, 2018 - 6:54 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — StarKist Co. agreed to plead guilty to a felony price fixing charge as part of a broad collusion investigation of the canned tuna industry, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday. The DOJ said StarKist faces up to a $100 million fine when it is sentenced. Prosecutors...
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