Freshwater pollution

In this March 12, 2019 satellite photo provided by NOAA, shows the Great Lakes in various degrees of snow and ice. A scientific report says the Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., which likely will bring more flooding and other extreme weather events such as heat waves and drought. The warming climate also could mean less overall snowfall even as lake-effect snowstorms get bigger. The report by researchers from universities primarily from the Midwest says agriculture could be hit especially hard, with later spring planting and summer dry spells. (NOAA via AP)
March 21, 2019 - 5:46 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., a trend likely to bring more extreme storms while also degrading water quality, worsening erosion and posing tougher challenges for farming, scientists reported Thursday. The annual mean air temperature...
Read More
FILE - In this June 25, 1952 file photo, a fire tug fights flames on the Cuyahoga River near downtown Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality.(The Plain Dealer via AP)
March 19, 2019 - 1:59 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Fish in the Cuyahoga River, which became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in Cleveland in 1969, are now safe to eat, federal environmental regulators say. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga was lauded Monday by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine...
Read More
An island of solar panels floats in a pond at the Los Bronces mining plant, about 65 kilometers (approximately 40 miles) from Santiago, Chile, Thursday, March 14, 2019. The island of solar panels could give purpose to mine refuse in Chile by using them to generate clean energy and reduce water evaporation.(AP Photo / Esteban Felix)
March 16, 2019 - 2:17 pm
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — In a story March 15 about a floating island of solar panels in Chile, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the array is 1,200 square feet. The array is 1,200 square meters. A corrected version of the story is below: SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — A floating island of solar...
Read More
FILE - This Aug. 7, 2014, image shows a contract employee watching a crews excavate contaminated soil at a site where millions of gallons of jet fuel leaked underground over decades at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, N.M. After excavating thousands of tons of soil and treating millions of gallons of water, New Mexico regulators say the U.S. Air Force still has work to do to clean up the contamination. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)
March 11, 2019 - 6:13 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The U.S. Air Force has excavated thousands of tons of soil and treated millions of gallons of water contaminated by jet fuel at a base bordering New Mexico's largest city, but state regulators say the military still has more cleanup to do. The New Mexico environment...
Read More
In this image from video provided the Environmental Protection Agency, Associated Press reporter Ellen Knickmeyer, in white, being pushed by a security guard out of EPA headquarters on May 22, 2018, in Washington. Newly released security camera footage discredits Trump administration claims that Knickmeyer tried to force her way into EPA headquarters to cover a summit on drinking water contaminants. Video obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request shows a security guard grab Knickmeyer by the shoulders and shove her out of the agency’s lobby. (EPA via AP)
February 26, 2019 - 5:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Security camera footage released Tuesday undermines Trump administration claims that a reporter for The Associated Press tried to force her way into the Environmental Protection Agency headquarters to cover a summit last year on drinking water contaminants. Video obtained through...
Read More
A dead fish floats in the Paraopeba River, full of mud that was released by the collapse of a mining company dam near a community of the Pataxo Ha-ha-hae indigenous people in Brumadinho, Brazil, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019. Mining giant Vale representatives insisted that the slow-moving mud spreading down the Paraopeba River following the Jan. 25 collapse is composed mostly of silica, or sand, and is non-toxic, but environmental groups contend the iron ore mine waste contains high levels of iron oxide that could cause irreversible damage. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
January 30, 2019 - 10:28 am
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — A torrent of mining waste unleashed by a dam breach that killed at least 84 people in southeastern Brazil is now heading down a small river with high concentrations of iron oxide, threatening to contaminate a much larger river that provides drinking water to communities in...
Read More
In this Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, photo, a thick layer of dust is seen over the tent city set up for the spiritual-cleansing Kumbh Festival in Prayagraj, India. The skies over the confluence of sacred rivers in north India where millions of Hindu priests and pilgrims have come to wash away their sins for the Kumbh Mela, or pitcher festival, that begins this week are thick with toxic dust, a sign that Indian government officials are struggling to grapple with India's worsening air pollution. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)
January 14, 2019 - 9:51 pm
PRAYAGRAJ, India (AP) — Thousands of portable toilets line roads constantly swept clean, drinking water flows from newly installed taps, electric substations power a massive tent city and billboards encourage a "clean Kumbh," an extension of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's huge push to...
Read More
FILE - In an Aug. 11, 2015 file photo, n Air Force military member walks out to medevac biocontainment unit aboard a C-17 military transport plane at Dobbins Air Force Reserve Base during a media tour, in Marietta, Ga. There are fears that groundwater near Georgia military bases could remain contaminated from a toxic firefighting foam used for decades by the U.S. Air Force. Recent tests at Georgia's three air bases show extensive environmental contamination of groundwater. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
January 05, 2019 - 5:17 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — Groundwater near Georgia military bases remains contaminated from a toxic firefighting foam used for decades by the U.S. Air Force, prompting fears among residents about their exposure to the chemicals. Recent tests at Georgia's three air bases show extensive environmental...
Read More
Drivers pass an abandoned car along Silas Creek Parkway in Winston-Salem, N.C., Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. Several Southern states hit hard by a wintry storm were gradually warming Tuesday, but forecasters warned that temperatures in many areas will plunge below freezing again Tuesday night. That will refreeze the melting snow, making some roads treacherous. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
December 11, 2018 - 3:54 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Seesawing temperatures across several southern states were gradually melting snow from a wintry storm, but also "transforming slushy roads into treacherous ice" during the morning commute, one governor warned Tuesday. Sunny skies in North Carolina and Virginia were helping to...
Read More
Mourners carry a coffin of prominent social activist Wissam al-Ghrawi in Basra, Iraq, Sunday, Nov. 18, 2018. Iraqi police say religious cleric Wissam, who was linked to the ongoing protests over poor services in Basra, was killed outside his home after suggested that demonstrators should take up arms over the conditions in the city. (AP Photo/Nabil al-Jurani)
November 18, 2018 - 9:29 am
BASRA, Iraq (AP) — Hundreds of Basra residents mourned a Muslim cleric on Sunday who police said was killed outside his home after he suggested that protesters should take up arms over poor public services in the city. Wissam al-Ghrawi was a prominent figure in demonstrations demanding clean water...
Read More

Pages