Judiciary

FILE - In this Friday, Nov. 30, 2018, file photo, Salvadoran migrant Cesar Jobet, right, and Daniel Jeremias Cruz, hide from U.S. border agents, after they dug a hole in the sand under the border structure and crossed over to the U.S. side, in Playas de Tijuana, Mexico. The two youths were detected by U.S. border agents and ran back to the Mexican side. Some immigrant youth looking to start over in the United States after fleeing abusive homes are seeing their applications for green cards rejected because the Trump administration says they're too old. A program in place since 1990 has let young immigrants file paperwork before age 21. But the U.S. government says some of these immigrants are too old once they turn 18. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa, File)
January 02, 2019 - 6:35 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Some immigrant youth looking to start over in the United States after fleeing abusive homes are seeing their applications for green cards rejected because the Trump administration says they're too old. A U.S. government program in place since 1990 has let young immigrants subject...
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Protestors block traffic and shout slogans reacting to reports of two women of menstruating age entering the Sabarimala temple, one of the world's largest Hindu pilgrimage sites, in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India, Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. India's Supreme Court on Sept. 28, 2018 lifted the ban on women of menstruating age from entering the temple, holding that equality is supreme irrespective of age and gender. (AP Photo/R S Iyer)
January 02, 2019 - 9:13 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — Two women on Wednesday entered one of India's largest Hindu pilgrimage sites that had been forbidden to females between the ages of 10 and 50, sparking protests across a southern state, with police firing tear gas at several places to disperse stone-throwing protesters, police said...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018 file photo, U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts listens as President Donald Trump delivers his first State of the Union address in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol to a joint session of Congress in Washington. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts is using his annual report on the federal judiciary to highlight the steps the branch has taken to combat inappropriate conduct in the workplace. (Win McNamee/Pool via AP)
December 31, 2018 - 6:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts is using his annual report on the federal judiciary to highlight the steps the branch has taken to combat inappropriate conduct in the workplace. In December 2017, Roberts asked that a working group be put together to examine the judiciary'...
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FILE - In this Sept. 28, 2018 file photo, Texas Governor Greg Abbott smiles before a gubernatorial debate against his Democratic challenger Lupe Valdez at the LBJ Library in Austin, Texas. Decisions about health care and education will top the agenda in many state capitols as lawmakers convene in new sessions in 2019. Abbott and the Republican-controlled Legislature will be wrestling with whether to tap as much as $5 billion from the state’s rainy-day fund to pay for the recovery from Hurricane Harvey, which swamped the southeast portion of the state in August 2017. (Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, Pool)
December 31, 2018 - 2:55 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Big-dollar decisions about health care and education will top the agenda in many state capitols as lawmakers convene for their 2019 sessions with a closer balance between Republicans and Democrats. Some states will be considering anew whether to expand government-funded...
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December 31, 2018 - 12:51 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge in Texas who recently declared the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional has stayed his ruling to allow for appeals. That means "Obamacare" remains in effect while litigation continues. In a ruling issued Sunday, Judge Reed O'Connor in Fort Worth wrote that he...
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FILE - In a Feb. 12, 2018 file photo, Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., stands at left as Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., speaks during a news conference about an immigration bill on Capitol Hill in Washington. Northern Michigan's Lake Superior State University on Monday released their 43rd annual List of Words Banished from the Queen's English for Mis-use, Over-use and General Uselessness. Some of the 18 chosen from public submissions include "in the books," "grapple," "optics," and "OTUS family of acronyms" such as POTUS for the President of the United States. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
December 31, 2018 - 12:13 am
DETROIT (AP) — No collusion! (Or at least a lot less of it.) That's according to a Michigan school's latest "List of Words Banished from the Queen's English for Mis-use, Over-use and General Uselessness." The politically charged term at the center of special prosecutor Robert Mueller's...
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FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2018, file photo, the Supreme Court is seen in Washington. The Supreme Court term has steered clear of drama since the tumultuous confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh. The next few weeks will test whether the calm can last. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
December 31, 2018 - 12:12 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court began its term with the tumultuous confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh, followed by a studied avoidance of drama on the high court bench — especially anything that would divide the five conservatives and four liberals. The justices have been unusually...
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This undated booking photo provided by the Michigan Department of Corrections shows Johnathan Brown. A police abuse lawsuit could have cost Detroit millions of dollars. But lawyers are closing the case after eight years, acknowledging that the claims of possibly 200,000 people are practically worthless. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of Brown and thousands of people who had been arrested by police years earlier. Detroit was accused of keeping crime suspects in cold, bare holding cells with no bedding and little food. Brown was detained for 55 hours during a homicide investigation and eventually "succumbed to the DPD detectives' tactics and gave a coerced statement," according to the lawsuit. (Michigan Department of Corrections via AP)
December 29, 2018 - 10:22 am
DETROIT (AP) — Detroit could have been on the hook for millions of dollars in a lawsuit alleging police abuse. Lawyers, however, are closing the case after eight years, acknowledging that the claims of possibly 200,000 people are practically worthless. The reason? Detroit's 2013 bankruptcy. The...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018, file photo, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton talks with Jeffrey Goldberg, editor in chief of The Atlantic, during The Atlantic Festival, in Washington. House Republicans say more investigation is needed into decisions made by the FBI and the Justice Department in 2016 as they brought an unceremonious end to their yearlong look at the department's handling of probes into Clinton's emails and Donald Trump's ties to Russia. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
December 28, 2018 - 10:40 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans say more investigation is needed into decisions made by the FBI and the Justice Department in 2016 as they brought an unceremonious end to their yearlong look at the department's handling of probes into Democrat Hillary Clinton's emails and Donald Trump's ties to...
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Protestors walk on Broad Street to demonstrate for Mumia Abu-Jamal outside the offices of District Attorney Larry Krasner, Friday, Dec. 28, 2018, in Philadelphia. A judge issued a split ruling Thursday that grants Abu-Jamal another chance to appeal his 1981 conviction in a Philadelphia police officer's death. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
December 28, 2018 - 6:57 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A court ruling this week puts the police murder case of former Black Panther Mumia Abu-Jamal back in the spotlight years after it drew the attention of Amnesty International, Hollywood celebrities and death penalty opponents worldwide. Abu-Jamal, a one-time taxi driver and radio...
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