Judiciary

FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 17, 2018, file photo, Christine Gagnon of Southington, Conn., protests with other family and friends who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses at Purdue Pharma LLP headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma is expected to file for bankruptcy after settlement talks over the nation’s deadly overdose crisis hit an impasse, attorneys general involved in the talks said Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019, in a message to their counterparts across the country. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
September 07, 2019 - 9:59 pm
CLEVELAND (AP) — OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma is expected to file for bankruptcy after settlement talks over the nation's deadly overdose crisis hit an impasse, attorneys general involved in the talks said Saturday. The breakdown puts the first federal trial over the opioid epidemic on track to...
Read More
Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch, President Donald Trump's first appointee to the high court, speaks to The Associated Press about events that have influenced his life and the loss of civility in public discourse, in his chambers at the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. Gorsuch has written a new book on the importance of civics and civility, and a defense of his preferred originalism method of interpreting laws and the Constitution. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
September 07, 2019 - 8:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Neil Gorsuch is following the path of Supreme Court colleagues-turned-authors in a new book in which he laments the loss of civility in public discourse. The 52-year-old justice wrote "A Republic, If You Can Keep It" because Americans should remember that their political...
Read More
September 06, 2019 - 8:24 pm
JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — The Alaska Department of Corrections has agreed to policy changes to accommodate Muslim inmates who wish to practice their religion, settling a lawsuit brought last year. A federal judge Friday signed the agreement in a case brought on behalf of two Muslim inmates by the...
Read More
Counterprotesters, including one wearing a horse mask, line the route of the Straight Pride Parade in Boston, Saturday, Aug. 31, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
September 04, 2019 - 11:28 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Boston's district attorney has asked Massachusetts' highest court to intervene in a dispute with a lower court judge over the arrest of counterprotesters during a "straight pride" parade in Boston over Labor Day weekend. Suffolk County District Attorney Rachael Rollins filed an...
Read More
September 04, 2019 - 9:05 pm
ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — The government's watchlist of more than 1 million people identified as "known or suspected terrorists" violates the constitutional rights of those placed on it, a federal judge ruled Wednesday. The ruling from U.S. District Judge Anthony Trenga grants summary judgment to...
Read More
FILE - In this July 24, 2019, file photo, Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., asks questions to former special counsel Robert Mueller, has he testifies before the House Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill, in Washington. Sensenbrenner says he is retiring from the House. First elected in 1978, the conservative and former House Judiciary Committee chairman is the chamber’s current second-longest serving member. Sensenbrenner says in a statement Wednesday, Sept. 4, that he will not seek re-election in November 2020. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
September 04, 2019 - 7:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Veteran Wisconsin Republican congressman Jim Sensenbrenner says he is retiring from the House. First elected in 1978, the conservative and former House Judiciary Committee chairman is the chamber's second-longest serving member. Sensenbrenner says in a statement Wednesday that he...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2019, file photo former Waymo employee Anthony Levandowski, center, leaves a federal courthouse in San Jose, Calif. A federal judge on Wednesday, Sept. 4, rejected a government recommendation that he impose a $10 million bail bond on Levandowski, a former Google engineer. Levandowski is accused of stealing self-driving car technology before joining Uber's effort to build robotic taxis for its ride-hailing service. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
September 04, 2019 - 5:08 pm
SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — A federal judge has rejected a government recommendation that he impose a $10 million bail bond on a former Google engineer who is accused of stealing self-driving car technology before joining Uber's effort to build robotic taxis. The preliminary ruling issued Wednesday by...
Read More
September 04, 2019 - 4:58 pm
DENVER (AP) — After watching his mother die slowly when he stopped her medication, Neil Mahoney knew he wanted the option of ending his own life peacefully when a doctor told him in July that he had months to live after being diagnosed with cancer. A physician was willing to help him do that under...
Read More
FILE - In this March 11, 2015 file photo, newly-filled and sealed cans of Miller Lite beer move along on a conveyor belt, at the MillerCoors Brewery, in Golden, Colo. A federal judge has ordered Anheuser-Busch to stop using packaging that implies MillerCoors’ light beers contain corn syrup. U.S. District Judge William Conley granted a preliminary injunction sought by MillerCoors. Bud Light’s packaging says “No Corn Syrup” in bold letters. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
September 04, 2019 - 3:09 pm
Big beer is still duking it out over corn syrup. A federal judge on Wednesday ordered Anheuser-Busch to stop using Bud Light packaging that implies rival brews made by MillerCoors contain corn syrup. The order extends an injunction issued in May that barred Anheuser-Busch from making those claims...
Read More
FILE - In this March 26, 2019, file photo, actor Jussie Smollett smiles and waves to supporters before leaving Cook County Court after his charges were dropped in Chicago. Smollett's attorneys have filed a motion this week arguing that the actor should not have to pay the city of Chicago $130,000 for the police investigation into what he claimed was a racist and homophobic attack in January, because he had no way of knowing how much time and money the department would spend on the probe. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty, File)
September 04, 2019 - 12:39 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Jussie Smollett's attorneys have filed a motion arguing that the actor should not have to pay Chicago $130,000 for a police investigation into what he claimed was a racist and homophobic attack, because he couldn't have known how much time and money the department would spend looking...
Read More

Pages