Materials industry

FILE - In this photo taken on March 21, 2020 police officers check on motorists in Baisieux, on the Belgian-French boarder, northern France. Criminals have spotted a new business opportunity with the coronavirus pandemic and are now plundering the needy and the fearful and even disrupting the medical sector, online and off, with fraud, counterfeit products and cybercrime, a report issued Friday by the European law enforcement agency Europol says. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler, File)
March 27, 2020 - 10:53 am
PARIS (AP) — Criminals are preying on a fearful public and disrupting the provision of medical care during the coronavirus pandemic by selling counterfeit products, impersonating health workers and hacking computers as many citizens do their jobs online at home, European law enforcement agency...
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Cashier George Wallace, of Quincy, Mass., center, works behind a plastic shield as a shopper, right, places groceries in a cart, Thursday, March 26, 2020, at a grocery store, in Quincy. Grocery stores across the U.S. are installing protective plastic shields at checkouts to help keep cashiers and shoppers from infecting each other with the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
AP News
March 26, 2020 - 2:21 pm
QUINCY, Mass. (AP) — Grocery stores across the U.S. are installing protective plastic shields at checkouts to help keep cashiers and shoppers from infecting one another with the coronavirus. At a Stop & Shop supermarket Thursday in Quincy, just south of Boston, shoppers paid for and bagged...
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March 24, 2020 - 8:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Thieves steal surgical masks. A clinic sells fake COVID-19 tests. Hate groups encourage sick members to infect law enforcement officers. Imposters pose as public health officials. Con artists peddle fake cures and financial scams. As the coronavirus pandemic spreads, so too do the...
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FILE - In a June 3, 2014, photo, the Paradise Fossil Plant stands in Drakesboro Ky. (AP Photo/Dylan Lovan, File)
March 24, 2020 - 1:21 pm
DRAKESBORO, Ky. (AP) — President Donald Trump tried to stop it from happening. The top Republican in the Senate, Mitch McConnell, did too. Despite their best efforts to make good on Trump’s campaign promise to save the beleaguered coal industry, including an eleventh-hour pressure campaign, the...
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., is followed by reporters and staff as he leaves a meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, March 20, 2020, to work on an economic package to deal with the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
March 23, 2020 - 1:23 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the fall of 2008, an unlikely alliance of lawmakers, regulators and Bush administration officials banded together to rescue an economy they feared was hours away from collapse. They also unwittingly reshaped American politics, unleashing a populist furor that lingers in both...
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In this May 19, 2011 photo, robots weld a Chevrolet Sonic at the General Motors Orion Assembly plant in Orion Township, Mich. General Motors, Ford, jet engine maker Rolls-Royce and other companies are talking to their governments about repurposing idled factories to produce vital goods to fight the coronavirus such as ventilators and surgical masks. On Friday, March 20, 2020 President Donald Trump invoked the Korean War-era Defense Production Act, allowing the government to marshal the private sector to fight the COVID-19 pandemic. Although it allows the government to steer factories to overcome shortages, makers of heavy goods such as cars and trucks can't just flip a switch and produce something else. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
March 21, 2020 - 3:02 pm
DETROIT (AP) — Factories that crank out cars and trucks looking into making much-needed ventilators. Distilleries intended for whiskey and rum to instead turn out hand sanitizers and disinfectants. And an electronics maker that builds display screens repurposed for surgical masks. All are answering...
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A sign notifying the availability of pasta in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak, outside Warwick Way Food & Wine in Victoria, London, Thursday March 19, 2020. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms. For some it can cause more severe illness. (Yui Mok/PA via AP)
March 19, 2020 - 6:35 pm
It was less than 11 weeks ago that the first cases of pneumonia were detected in Wuhan, China. The speed at which what would soon be named COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, knocked the global economy askew is unparalleled in our lifetimes. Following are developments Thursday...
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FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2016, file photo, a mechanized shovel loads coal from an 80-feet thick seam at the Spring Creek mine near Decker, Mont. Montana regulators reached a deal Thursday, March 12, 2020, allowing the state to enforce environmental laws at the mine after it was bought last year by a Navajo-owned company. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
March 12, 2020 - 6:54 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Montana regulators have reached a deal allowing the state to enforce environmental laws at a large coal mine bought by a Navajo-owned company, officials said Thursday. For months, executives from the Navajo Transitional Energy Company and state officials had been unable to...
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In this March 5, 2020 photo released by Xinhua News Agency, a mobile crane prepares to move containers at a logistic station of Shenyang East Railway Station in Shenyang, northeast China's Liaoning Province. China's exports fell by double digits in January and February as anti-virus controls closed factories, while imports sank by a smaller margin. (Pan Yulong/Xinhua via AP)
March 07, 2020 - 1:17 am
BEIJING (AP) — China’s exports fell by double digits in January and February as anti-virus controls closed factories, while imports sank by a smaller margin. Exports tumbled 17.2% from a year earlier to $292.4 billion, a sharp reverse from December’s 7.8% rise, customs data showed Saturday. Imports...
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FILE - In this Oct. 22, 2013 file photo, former Chairman and CEO of General Electric Jack Welch appears on CNBC on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Welch, who transformed General Electric Co. into a highly profitable multinational conglomerate and parlayed his legendary business acumen into a retirement career as a corporate leadership guru, has died at the age of 84. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
March 02, 2020 - 10:38 am
BOSTON (AP) — Jack Welch, who transformed General Electric Co. into a highly profitable multinational conglomerate and parlayed his legendary business acumen into a retirement career as a corporate leadership guru, has died. He was 84. His death was confirmed Monday by GE. The cause of death was...
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