Science

COVID-19 antibody testing and diagnostic testing are administered at a converted vehicle inspection station, Tuesday, July 7, 2020, in San Antonio. Local officials across Texas say their hospitals are becoming increasingly stretched and are in danger of becoming overrun as cases of the coronavirus surge. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
AP News
July 11, 2020 - 4:39 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A long-expected upturn in U.S. coronavirus deaths has begun, driven by fatalities in states in the South and West, according to data on the pandemic. The number of deaths per day from the virus had been falling for months, and even remained down as states like Florida and Texas saw...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, July 7, 2020, file photo, Pittsburgh Pirates first baseman Josh Bell, right, listens to manager Derek Shelton during a team workout at PNC Park in Pittsburgh. Shelton and other first-year managers are scrambling to make up for lost time. The rookie skippers are getting creative when it comes to getting a feel for their players during a season unlike any other. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
July 11, 2020 - 12:58 pm
PITTSBURGH (AP) — Derek Shelton needs his freedom. Maybe now more than ever. Fortunately for the first-year Pittsburgh Pirates manager, bench coach Donnie Kelly made it a point to provide it. Each day Kelly puts together a meticulous schedule designed to find a way for separate groups of players to...
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Natalia Afonso, 27, an international student from Brazil at Brooklyn College, sits on a stoop outside her home during an interview, Thursday, July 9, 2020, in New York. Afonso, who is studying teaching education and finished her first semester this spring, said she has lived in the U.S. for 7 years and "I don't see myself moving back to Brazil at this point. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
July 11, 2020 - 1:01 am
PHOENIX (AP) — International students worried about a new immigration policy that could potentially cost them their visas say they feel stuck between being unnecessarily exposed during the coronavirus pandemic and being able to finish their studies in America. Students from countries as diverse as...
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July 09, 2020 - 2:44 pm
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization is acknowledging the possibility that COVID-19 might be spread in the air under certain conditions — after more than 200 scientists urged the agency to do so. In an open letter published this week in a journal, two scientists from Australia and the U.S...
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A worker walks among graves at a special cemetery for people who presumably died of COVID-19 at a cemetery in Jakarta, Indonesia Friday, June 12, 2020. As Indonesia’s virus death toll rises, the world’s most populous Muslim country finds itself at odds with protocols put in place by the government to handle the bodies of victims of the pandemic. This has led to increasing incidents of bodies being taken from hospitals, rejection of COVID-19 health and safety procedures, and what some experts say is a lack of communication from the government. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
July 09, 2020 - 12:43 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — The mob of over 150 people who forcefully took Muhammad Yunus’ cadaver from a hospital in eastern Indonesia thought it was impossible that the 49-year-old Islamic preacher could have died from the coronavirus. He had always washed his hands, worn a mask and followed health...
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Commuters wearing face masks to protect against the spread of the new coronavirus walk through a subway station in Beijing, Thursday, July 9, 2020. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
July 08, 2020 - 11:24 pm
BEIJING — China says it has nine new confirmed coronavirus cases, all of them brought from outside the country, and no new deaths. Thursday’s report buttresses growing signs the virus has been essentially contained inside the nation in which it first appeared late last year. The near elimination of...
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July 08, 2020 - 4:04 pm
A new report studying the impact of the coronavirus on workers at meat processing plants has found that 87% of people infected were racial or ethnic minorities and that at least 86 workers have died. The report released Tuesday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention examined more...
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In this June 5, 2020 photo provided by the Mountain Area Health Education Center, physicians, residents and staff from the facility in Asheville, N.C., take a knee to show support for renewed calls for racial justice after the police killing of George Floyd. Government statistics from late January through May 30 suggest an increase in U.S. deaths from chronic diseases compared with historical trends. They include 7,000 excess deaths from hypertension, about 4,000 from diabetes and 3,000 from strokes -- all conditions that disproportionately affect Blacks, although the data don’t include race. (Brenda Benik/MAHEC via AP)
July 05, 2020 - 10:07 am
Doctors have known it for a long time, well before the resounding cries of “Black Lives Matter”: Black people suffer disproportionately. They face countless challenges to good health, among them food, transportation and income. The stress of living with racism has very real, physical effects. And...
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FILE - In this Jan. 1, 2018 file photo, Italian Maestro Riccardo Muti conducts the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra during the traditional New Year's concert at the golden hall of Vienna's Musikverein, Austria. Nine musicians from the Syrian diaspora in Europe are playing in the 24th friendship concert conducted by Riccardo Muti, this year at the Paestum archaeological site in southern Italy, but the coronavirus pandemic blocked others from arriving directly from Syria. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak, File)
July 05, 2020 - 10:03 am
RAVENNA, Italy (AP) — Nine musicians from the Syrian diaspora in Europe are playing Sunday in the 24th friendship concert conducted by Riccardo Muti, this year at the Paestum archaeological site in southern Italy, but the coronavirus pandemic blocked others from arriving directly from Syria. The...
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FILE - In this Friday, April 17, 2020 file photo, a health worker arrives to take a nose swab sample as part of testing for the COVID-19 coronavirus at a nursing and rehabilitation facility in Seattle. Nursing home residents are among the Americans getting $1,200 checks as part of the U.S. government’s plan to revive the economy in 2020. But with many long-term care facilities under lockdown to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks, what are the rules around how the money is handled? (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
July 04, 2020 - 9:30 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Nursing home residents are among the Americans getting $1,200 checks as part of the U.S. government’s plan to revive the economy. But with many long-term care facilities under lockdown to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks, what are the rules around how the money is handled? The situation...
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