Shopping

In this Thursday, March 19, 2020, photo, Frankie Keenan shoots baskets with his daughter Rachel, 9, at their home in San Francisco. California's Bay Area has been shut down for more than a week, the first region of America to order its residents to stay home, work remotely and homeschool their children in a desperate bid to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
AP News
March 27, 2020 - 8:15 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — One week in isolation. Two families. Only a few miles away, yet a world apart. For San Francisco lawyer Rebecca Biernat, a mother of three, "sheltering in place" started out in a panic, but her family is now adjusting. She is working from home. Her kids are keeping busy with...
Read More
This undated image released by Maggie Hellman shows Hellman with her husband Jeremy and their three children, from left, Gili, 2, Yehuda, 7, and Elisheva, 5, at their New Jersey home. The coronavirus outbreak is having an impact on couples and their relationships. Maggie Hellman created a Facebook group for her friends to blow off their own steam. (Abbie Sophia Photography/Maggie Hellman via AP)
March 27, 2020 - 4:03 am
The 60-something husband works in the food industry and still insists upon leaving every day for work, saying he needs to keep his business afloat. His frightened wife desperately wants him to stay home. For another couple, in the midst of a separation, the bitterly fought issue is the kids and...
Read More
Cashier George Wallace, of Quincy, Mass., center, works behind a plastic shield as a shopper, right, places groceries in a cart, Thursday, March 26, 2020, at a grocery store, in Quincy. Grocery stores across the U.S. are installing protective plastic shields at checkouts to help keep cashiers and shoppers from infecting each other with the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
AP News
March 26, 2020 - 2:21 pm
QUINCY, Mass. (AP) — Grocery stores across the U.S. are installing protective plastic shields at checkouts to help keep cashiers and shoppers from infecting one another with the coronavirus. At a Stop & Shop supermarket Thursday in Quincy, just south of Boston, shoppers paid for and bagged...
Read More
Barber Sami Matta, left, gives a haircut to Steve Perosino, of Dedham, Mass., right, at Chris & Sam's Barbershop, in Norwood, Mass., Monday, March 23, 2020. The Barbershop is to close by noon Tuesday, March 24, in keeping with Mass. Gov. Charlie Baker's order that all non-essential businesses close at noon Tuesday and remain closed through Tuesday, April 7, out of concern about the spread of the coronavirus. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia. The vast majority of people recover from the new virus. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
March 23, 2020 - 4:55 pm
The rapid spread of the coronavirus since it was first reported in China has dealt an unprecedented shock to the global economy. Following are business developments Monday related to the outbreak as governments attempt to stabilize their economies, companies struggle to cope and millions of people...
Read More
People wear face masks as they walk through an office complex in Beijing, Friday, March 20, 2020. Italy's deaths from the coronavirus pandemic eclipsed China's on Thursday as the scourge extended its march across the West, where the United States and other countries increasingly enlisted the military to prepare for an onslaught of patients and California's governor ordered people in the most-populous U.S. state to stay home. The virus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough, for most people, but severe illness is more likely in the elderly and people with existing health problems. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
March 21, 2020 - 2:00 am
The Latest on the coronavirus pandemic, which has infected more than 275,000 people and killed more than 11,300. The COVID-19 illness causes mild or moderate symptoms in most people, but severe symptoms are more likely in the elderly or those with existing health problems. More than 88,200 people...
Read More
Shoppers wait in line to enter a Stop & Shop supermarket during hours open daily only for seniors Thursday, March 19, 2020, in North Providence, R.I. This week grocery store chains and other retailers began offering special shopping hours for seniors and other groups considered the most vulnerable to the new coronavirus. The dedicated shopping times are designed to allow seniors, pregnant women and people with underlying health conditions to shop among smaller crowds and reduce their chances of acquiring the virus. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
March 20, 2020 - 4:48 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — As senior citizens deal with anxiety about the coronavirus, grocery store chains and other retailers have come up with a way to ease their fears: shopping times reserved exclusively for them. Target, Whole Foods, Walmart and Dollar General, as well as supermarkets in Europe,...
Read More
FILE - In this Dec. 17, 2019, file photo, Tahsha Sydnor stows packages into special containers after Amazon robots deliver separated packages by zip code at an Amazon warehouse facility in Goodyear, Ariz. On Monday, March 16, 2020, Amazon said that it needs to hire 100,000 people across the U.S. to keep up with a crush of orders as the coronavirus spreads and keeps more people at home, shopping online. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
March 16, 2020 - 6:09 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon said Monday that it needs to hire 100,000 people across the U.S. to keep up with a crush of orders as the coronavirus spreads and keeps more people at home, shopping online. The online retailer said it will also temporarily raise pay by $2 an hour through the end of April for...
Read More
A man rides a pedal car down what would normally be a busy tourist area in the historic center of Antwerp, Belgium, Saturday, March 14, 2020. Belgium has closed schools, restaurants and bars, as as well as cancelled sporting and cultural events in an effort to contain the spread of the coronavirus. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
March 14, 2020 - 11:21 pm
The Latest on the world's coronavirus pandemic, which has infected more than 150,000 people and killed more than 5,700. The disease for most people causes only mild or moderate symptoms. For some, it can cause more severe illness. A man in his 70s has become the first person in Oregon to die from...
Read More
This circa 1985 photo provided by Esme Gibson shows Joe Coulombe, the founder of the Trader Joe's market chain, at his home in Pasadena, Calif. Coulombe, the man who created Trader Joe's markets with a vision that college-educated but poorly paid young people would buy healthy foods if they could only afford them, has died. Coulombe's family says he died Friday, Feb. 28, 2020 at age 89. He opened the first of his quirky, nautically themed markets in Pasadena, California, in 1967. He stocked it with granola, organic foods and other items he bought directly from suppliers to hold prices down. Trader Joe's now has more than 500 stores in over 40 states. (Image by Esme via AP)
AP News
February 29, 2020 - 3:10 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Joe Coulombe envisioned a new generation of young grocery shoppers emerging in the 1960s, one that wanted healthy, tasty, high-quality food they couldn’t find in most supermarkets and couldn’t afford to buy in the few high-end gourmet outlets. So he found a new way to bring...
Read More
In this Feb. 21, 2020 photo, a worker pushes a cart inside an Amazon Go Grocery store set to open soon in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood. Following the opening of several smaller convenience-type stores using an app and cashier-less technology to tally shoppers' selections, the store will be the first Amazon Go full-sized cashier-less grocery store. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
February 25, 2020 - 6:39 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon wants to kill the supermarket checkout line. The online retailing giant is opening its first cashier-less supermarket, where shoppers can grab milk or eggs and walk out without waiting in line or ever opening their wallets. It's the latest sign that Amazon is serious about...
Read More

Pages