Technology issues

A woman covers her face as she shops at a food market in Tel Aviv, Israel, Sunday, March 15, 2020. ‏Israel has imposed a number of tough restrictions to slow the spread of the new coronavirus. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced that schools, universities, restaurants and places of entertainment will be closed to stop the spread of the coronavirus. He also encouraged people not to go to their workplaces unless absolutely necessary. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
March 15, 2020 - 6:44 pm
JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel has long been known for its use of technology to track the movements of Palestinian militants. Now, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu wants to use similar technology to stop the movement of the coronavirus. Netanyahu’s Cabinet on Sunday authorized the Shin Bet security...
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FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2020, file photo, Kashmiri journalists browse the internet on their mobile phones inside the media center set up by government authorities in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir. Indian authorities on Wednesday, March 4, temporarily revoked a ban on social media sites and restored full internet access in disputed Kashmir for two weeks, seven months after they stripped the restive region of its statehood and semi-autonomy and enforced a total communications blackout. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin, File)
March 04, 2020 - 11:17 am
SRINAGAR, India (AP) — Indian authorities on Wednesday temporarily revoked a ban on social media sites and restored full internet access in disputed Kashmir for two weeks, seven months after they stripped the restive region of its statehood and semi-autonomy and enforced a total communications...
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March 02, 2020 - 3:55 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A software engineer on trial for the largest leak of classified information in CIA history was “prepared to do anything” to betray the agency, federal prosecutors said Monday as a defense attorney argued the man had been scapegoated for a breach that exposed secret cyberweapons and...
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February 28, 2020 - 2:00 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The Federal Communications Commission has proposed roughly $200 million in fines combined for the four major U.S. phone companies for improperly disclosing customers' real-time location. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said during a news conference Friday that the fines amounted to $91...
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FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2019, file photo, a man feeds a ballot card into a digital voting machine during a demonstration in Raleigh, N.C. Americans have widespread concerns about the security and integrity of elections. Few say they have high confidence that votes in the 2020 presidential election will be counted accurately. A poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds skepticism about the democratic process in the United States. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed, File)
February 27, 2020 - 10:01 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans have widespread concerns about the security and integrity of elections, with few saying they have high confidence that votes in the 2020 presidential election will be counted accurately. A poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds...
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Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks at a campaign event in Myrtle Beach, S.C., Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2020. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
February 26, 2020 - 8:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic National Committee has warned its presidential candidates to be cautious after Bernie Sanders' campaign reported that an “impersonator” with a domain registered overseas had posed as one of its staffers and sought conversations with members of at least two other...
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This is a court artist sketch of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange in the dock reading his papers as he appears at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court for his extradition hearing, in London, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The U.S. government and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will face off Monday in a high-security London courthouse, a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American officials by publishing a trove of classified military documents. (Elizabeth Cook/PA via AP)
February 24, 2020 - 8:36 am
LONDON (AP) — The U.S. government began outlining its extradition case against Julian Assange in a London court on Monday, arguing that the WikiLeaks founder is not a free-speech champion but an “ordinary” criminal who put many lives at risk with his secret-spilling. U.S. authorities want to try...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2019, file photo, Steve Marcinkus, an Investigator with the Office of the City Commissioners, demonstrates the ExpressVote XL voting machine at the Reading Terminal Market in Philadelphia. Nearly 1 in 5 U.S. voters will cast ballots this year on devices that look and feel like the discredited paperless voting machines they once used, yet leave a paper record of the vote. Computer security experts are warning that these so-called ballot-marking devices pose too much of a risk. Ballot-marking machines were initially developed not as primary vote-casting tools but as “accessible” alternatives for the disabled. They print out paper records that are scanned by optical readers that tabulate the vote. They cost at least twice as much as hand-marked paper ballots, which computer scientists prefer because paper can’t be hacked. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
February 23, 2020 - 4:30 pm
In the rush to replace insecure, unreliable electronic voting machines after Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential race, state and local officials have scrambled to acquire more trustworthy equipment for this year’s election, when U.S. intelligence agencies fear even worse problems...
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Former Pink Floyd bass player Roger Waters speaks to crowds gathered at Parliament Square in London, protesting against the imprisonment and extradition of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange extradition, Saturday Feb. 22, 2020. (Isabel Infantes/PA via AP)
February 22, 2020 - 1:39 pm
LONDON (AP) — Hundreds of supporters of Julian Assange marched through London on Saturday to pressure the U.K. government into refusing to extradite the WikiLeaks founder to the United States to face spying charges. Famous backers, including Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters, Pretenders singer Chrissie...
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FILE - In this Dec. 9, 2019 file photo, Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif, the ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, confers with Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, and Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, during a break as the House Judiciary Committee considers the investigative findings in the impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, on Capitol Hill in Washington. New documents released on Friday, Jan. 17, 2020, by House Democrats suggest that Nunes was more deeply involved than was previously known in efforts by allies of President Donald Trump to dig up dirt in Ukraine on former Vice President Joe Biden. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
February 21, 2020 - 8:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Friday dismissed a racketeering lawsuit brought by Republican Rep. Devin Nunes against the political research firm that enlisted a former British spy to look into Donald Trump’s ties to Russia during the 2016 presidential campaign. Nunes, the former chairman of...
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