Water quality

Larry Poell, who lives on top of a Superfund site in Mead, Neb., adjusts Wednesday, March 27, 2019, the overalls of his granddaughter, while visiting a flood relief shelter in Ashland. Poell said federal officials have always maintained that the contaminated plumes are stable, but he wonders if the floodwater caused them to shift. "I'm concerned about it, I think everybody's concerned about it," he said. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
March 28, 2019 - 11:26 am
MEAD, Neb. (AP) — Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, federal regulators said Wednesday. The Environmental Protection...
Read More
A family stand outside their submerged huts near Nhamatanda, about 130km from Beira, in Mozambique, Tuesday, March, 26, 2019. Relief operations pressed into remote areas of central Mozambique where an unknown number of people remain without aid more than 10 days after a cyclone ripped across the country, while trucks attempted to reach the hard-hit city of Beira on a badly damaged road. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
March 26, 2019 - 2:43 pm
BEIRA, Mozambique (AP) — Cyclone-ravaged Mozambique faces a "second disaster" from cholera and other diseases, the World Health Organization warned on Tuesday, while relief operations pressed into rural areas where an unknown number of people remain without aid more than 10 days after the storm...
Read More
March 25, 2019 - 3:02 pm
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — In a story March 23 about the aftermath of a Brazilian dam collapse, The Associated Press reported erroneously that a new evacuation had been ordered for people near a dam. They had been evacuated in February. A corrected version of the story is below: Brazilian miner Vale...
Read More
In this March 12, 2019 satellite photo provided by NOAA, shows the Great Lakes in various degrees of snow and ice. A scientific report says the Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., which likely will bring more flooding and other extreme weather events such as heat waves and drought. The warming climate also could mean less overall snowfall even as lake-effect snowstorms get bigger. The report by researchers from universities primarily from the Midwest says agriculture could be hit especially hard, with later spring planting and summer dry spells. (NOAA via AP)
March 21, 2019 - 5:46 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., a trend likely to bring more extreme storms while also degrading water quality, worsening erosion and posing tougher challenges for farming, scientists reported Thursday. The annual mean air temperature...
Read More
FILE - In this June 25, 1952 file photo, a fire tug fights flames on the Cuyahoga River near downtown Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality.(The Plain Dealer via AP)
March 19, 2019 - 1:59 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Fish in the Cuyahoga River, which became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in Cleveland in 1969, are now safe to eat, federal environmental regulators say. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga was lauded Monday by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine...
Read More
An island of solar panels floats in a pond at the Los Bronces mining plant, about 65 kilometers (approximately 40 miles) from Santiago, Chile, Thursday, March 14, 2019. The island of solar panels could give purpose to mine refuse in Chile by using them to generate clean energy and reduce water evaporation.(AP Photo / Esteban Felix)
March 16, 2019 - 2:17 pm
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — In a story March 15 about a floating island of solar panels in Chile, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the array is 1,200 square feet. The array is 1,200 square meters. A corrected version of the story is below: SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — A floating island of solar...
Read More
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand
Anthony Behar
March 15, 2019 - 6:13 pm
MERRIMACK, N.H. (AP) — Democratic presidential hopeful Kirsten Gillibrand is trying to connect with voters' important issues on the ground — or, in some cases, underground. The U.S. senator from New York held two roundtable discussions Friday in New Hampshire communities struggling with...
Read More
FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 4, 2017 file photo, pyres of ivory are set on fire in Nairobi National Park, Kenya. Kenya's president Saturday set fire to 105 tons of elephant ivory and more than 1 ton of rhino horn, believed to be the largest stockpile ever destroyed, in a dramatic statement against the trade in ivory and products from endangered species. According to a scientific report from the United Nations released on Wednesday, March 13, 2019, climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics, pesticides and hormone-changing chemicals in the water are making the planet an increasing unhealthy place for people. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
March 13, 2019 - 8:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth is sick with multiple and worsening environmental ills killing millions of people yearly, a new U.N. report says. Climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics,...
Read More
Wells Fargo CEO Timothy Sloan is questioned by the House Financial Services Committee about revelations the bank had created millions of fake bank accounts to reach their financial goals, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 12, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 12, 2019 - 12:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The CEO of beleaguered Wells Fargo is telling Congress the bank has cleaned up its act after a series of scandals that affected millions of customers. But Democrats - and some Republicans - on the House Financial Services Committee aren't buying it. Wells Fargo CEO and President...
Read More
FILE - This Aug. 7, 2014, image shows a contract employee watching a crews excavate contaminated soil at a site where millions of gallons of jet fuel leaked underground over decades at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, N.M. After excavating thousands of tons of soil and treating millions of gallons of water, New Mexico regulators say the U.S. Air Force still has work to do to clean up the contamination. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)
March 11, 2019 - 6:13 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The U.S. Air Force has excavated thousands of tons of soil and treated millions of gallons of water contaminated by jet fuel at a base bordering New Mexico's largest city, but state regulators say the military still has more cleanup to do. The New Mexico environment...
Read More

Pages